Sunday, March 29, 2020

Here's What Happens If You Stopped Brushing Your Teeth


Nearly half of Americans don’t brush their teeth enough. This opens the door for a bacteria invasion, leading to tooth decay and gum disease. Even worse, you might increase your risk for issues like kidney disease and dementia.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Seal Out Tooth Decay


Brushing and flossing are the best ways to help prevent cavities, but it’s not always easy to clean every nook and cranny of your teeth – especially those back teeth you use to chew (called molars). Molars are rough, uneven and a favorite place for leftover food and cavity-causing bacteria to hide.

Still, there’s another safety net to help keep those teeth clean. It’s called a sealant, and it is a thin, protective coating (made from plastic or other dental materials) that adheres to the chewing surface of your back teeth. They’re no substitute for brushing and flossing, but they can keep cavities from forming and may even stop early stages of decay from becoming a full-blown cavity.

In fact, sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars. This is especially important when it comes to your child's dental health. In October 2016, the Centers for Disease Control released a report on the importance of sealants for school-aged children, of which only 43% of children ages 6-11 have. According to the CDC, "school-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants."

You may have many questions about sealants, and we have answers for you below. Read on to learn more about sealing out tooth decay.

How Do Sealants Work?

Think of them as raincoats for your teeth. When the cavity-causing bacteria that live in everyone’s mouth meet leftover food particles, they produce acids that can create holes in teeth. These holes are cavities. After sealant has been applied it keeps those bits of food out and stops bacteria and acid from settling on your teeth—just like a raincoat keeps you clean and dry during a storm.

Who Can Get Sealants?

Children and adults can benefit from sealants, but the earlier you get them, the better. Your first molars appear around age 6, and second molars break through around age 12. Sealing these teeth as soon as they come through can keep them cavity-free from the start, which helps save time and money in the long run. Ask your dentist if sealants are a good option for you and your family.

How Are Sealants Applied?

It’s a quick and painless process. Your dentist will clean and dry your tooth before placing an acidic gel on your teeth. This gel roughs up your tooth surface so a strong bond will form between your tooth and the sealant. After a few seconds, your dentist will rinse off the gel and dry your tooth once again before applying the sealant onto the grooves of your tooth. Your dentist will then use a special blue light to harden the sealant.

Can Sealants Be Placed Over Cavities?

Sealants can be used over areas of early decay to prevent further damage to your tooth. Because some sealants are clear, your dentist can keep an eye on the tooth to make sure the sealant is doing its job.

Are There Any Side Effects?

With the exception of an allergy that may exist, there are no known side effects from sealants.

Is There BPA In Sealants?

Yes, there is a tiny amount of BPA in sealants but not enough to cause you or a loved one any harm. In fact, you get more exposure to BPA by simply touching a receipt, using cosmetics or coming in contact with dust.


How Long Do Sealants Last?

Sealants will often last for several years before they need to be reapplied. During your regular dental visit, your dentist will check the condition of the sealant and can reapply them as needed.

Are Sealants Covered By Dental Plans?

Some plans do cover sealants, so call your dental benefit company to find out what kind of coverage you have.

Article Source: https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sealants?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhtopstories&utm_content=sealants

Monday, March 23, 2020

Regency Dental Group is Open for Emergency Treatments


Regency Dental takes the health of our staff and patients seriously. In accordance to recommendations from both the CDC and government agencies, as well as dental professional associations, we are postponing all elective and non-emergency treatments until further notice. 

We are, however, OPEN FOR EMERGENCY TREATMENTS ONLY
If you are in pain, please call the office at 707-453-1776 and we will work to get you out of pain. 

In this time of unprecedented uncertainty, we hope you will all understand our decision. Stay safe and healthy everyone!

Friday, March 20, 2020

Remedies for Burning Tongue


An oral burn calls for a swift response if you want to ease the pain. Fortunately, there are several burning tongue remedies that can help next time a swig of steaming coffee or bite of pizza hits a nerve.

Saturday, March 14, 2020

The Four Types of Dental Bridges


If you're missing one or more teeth, you're not alone. Fortunately, you have multiple options for replacing these missing teeth, including dental bridges. Here are four types of dental bridges that your dentist may recommend.

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

How Do Braces Actually Work?


Misaligned teeth can put you at risk for tooth decay, gum disease, and even tooth loss. Braces shift teeth by applying pressure, which constricts blood flow to the surrounding tissue that holds those teeth in place. That, in turn, causes special immune cells called osteoclasts to rush in and dissolve part of the jawbone, creating a space for the tooth to slide over and relieve the pressure.