Tuesday, December 6, 2022

what do BUMPS on your TONGUE mean?


Let's talk about tongue bumps... which ones are normal, and which ones aren't! Most tongue bumps are normal. Our tongues are covered in hundreds of papillae, with four main types. And on occasion, they get irritated or swell up. But when there are asymmetrical bumps on our tongue or sore areas that stay irritated for more than 10-14 days, it’s important to see your dentist for an oral exam. While most serious types of oral disease aren’t on the surface of your tongue where these mouth bumps are, it’s still important to rule out anything too major. Otherwise, irritated taste buds typically improve within a few days. Be sure to avoid triggers like acidic foods, which might make some people more prone to flare-ups.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, December 3, 2022

Other Components of Toothpaste : Xylitol

A systematic review reported two out of ten studies by the same authors on the same population showed toothpastes with xylitol as an ingredient were more effective at preventing dental caries in permanent teeth of children than toothpastes containing fluoride alone. Furthermore, xylitol has not been found to cause any harmful effects. However, further investigation into the efficacy of toothpastes containing xylitol is required as the currently available studies are of low quality and high risk of bias.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, November 30, 2022

Other Components of Toothpaste : Miscellaneous Components

Agents are added to suppress the tendency of toothpaste to dry into a powder. Included are various sugar alcohols, such as glycerol, sorbitol, or xylitol, or related derivatives, such as 1,2-propylene glycol and polyethyleneglycol. Strontium chloride or potassium nitrate is included in some toothpastes to reduce sensitivity. Two systemic meta-analysis reviews reported that arginine, and calcium sodium phosphosilicate - CSPS containing toothpastes are also effective in alleviating dentinal hypersensitivity respectively. Another randomized clinical trial found superior effects when both formulas were combined.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, November 27, 2022

Root Canal Procedure Step by Step


Let's see what happens during a root canal procedure!

A root canal procedure is extremely safe and one of the best ways to preserve an abscessed or dying tooth. The process itself can be performed with sedation if you want, but local anesthetic may be all that you need. Your dentist will clean the tooth out, seal it off, then top it off with a crown. The overall length and root canal cost will depend on how many roots are involved and what your insurance coverage looks like. The best thing to do is talk to your dentist or endodontist for an itemized care plan!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, November 24, 2022

Happy Thanksgiving.


Happy Thanksgiving from Us to You.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com


Monday, November 21, 2022

Other Components of Toothpaste : Remineralizing Agents

Chemical repair (remineralization) of early tooth decay is promoted naturally by saliva. However, this process can be enhanced by various remineralisation agents. Fluoride promotes remineralization, but is limited by bioavailable calcium. Casein phosphopeptide stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is a toothpaste ingredient containing bioavailable calcium that has been widely research to be the most clinically effective remineralization agent that enhances the action of saliva and fluoride. Peptide-based systems, hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and a variety of calcium phosphates have been advocated as remineralization agents; however, more clinical evidence is required to substantiate their effectiveness.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, November 18, 2022

Deep Cleaning vs Regular Cleaning (Dental Hygienist Explains)


Let's talk about the differences between a deep cleaning (aka "scaling and root planing") and a normal cleaning (aka "oral prophylaxis) and how to find out which type of dental cleaning will best benefit your individual mouth!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, November 15, 2022

Other Components of Toothpaste : Flavorants


Toothpaste comes in a variety of colors and flavors, intended to encourage use of the product. The three most common flavorants are peppermint, spearmint, and wintergreen. Toothpaste flavored with peppermint-anise oil is popular in the Mediterranean region. These flavors are provided by the respective oils, e.g. peppermint oil. More exotic flavors include Anethole anise, apricot, bubblegum, cinnamon, fennel, lavender, neem, ginger, vanilla, lemon, orange, and pine. Alternatively, unflavored toothpastes exist.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, November 12, 2022

Other Components of Toothpaste : Antibacterial Agents

Triclosan, an antibacterial agent, is a common toothpaste ingredient in the United Kingdom. Triclosan or zinc chloride prevent gingivitis and, according to the American Dental Association, helps reduce tartar and bad breath. A 2006 review of clinical research concluded there was evidence for the effectiveness of 0.30% triclosan in reducing plaque and gingivitis. Another Cochrane review in 2013 has found that triclosan achieved a 22% reduction in plaque, and in gingivitis, a 48% reduction in bleeding gums. However, there was insufficient evidence to show a difference in fighting periodontitis and there was no evidence either of any harmful effects associated with the use of triclosan toothpastes for more than 3 years. The evidence relating to plaque and gingivitis was considered to be of moderate quality while for periodontitis was low quality. Recently, triclosan has been removed as an ingredient from well-known toothpaste formulations. This may be attributed to concerns about adverse effects associated with triclosan exposure. Triclosan use in cosmetics has been positively correlated with triclosan levels in human tissues, plasma and breast milk, and is considered to have potential neurotoxic effects. Long-term studies are needed to substantiate these concerns.

Chlorhexidine is another antimicrobial agent used in toothpastes, however it is more commonly added in mouthwash products. Sodium laureth sulfate, a foaming agent, is a common toothpaste ingredient that also possesses some antimicrobial activities. There are also many commercial products available in the market containing different essential oils, herbal ingredients (e.g. chamomile, neem, chitosan, Aloe vera), and natural or plant extracts (e.g. hinokitiol). These ingredients are claimed by the manufacturers to fight plaque, bad breath and prevent gum disease. A 2020 systematic metareview found that herbal toothpastes are as effective as non-herbal toothpastes in reducing dental plaque at shorter period of follow-up (4 weeks). However, this evidence comes from low-quality studies.

The stannous (tin) ion, commonly added to toothpastes as stannous fluoride or stannous chloride, has been shown to have antibacterial effects in the mouth. Research has shown that stannous fluoride-containing toothpaste inhibits extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production in a multispecies biofilm greater than sodium fluoride-containing toothpaste. This is thought to contribute to a reduction in plaque and gingivitis when using stannous fluoride-containing toothpastes when compared to other toothpastes, and has been evidenced through numerous clinical trials. In addition to its antibacterial properties, stabilised stannous fluoride toothpastes have been shown to protect against dental erosion and dentine hypersensitivity, making it a multifunctional component in toothpaste formulations.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, November 9, 2022

Cold Sores VS Canker Sores


What's the difference between a cold sore and a canker sore?  Are either of them contagious?  How can we prevent them and/or treat them?!  Let's talk!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, November 6, 2022

Ingredients of Toothpaste : Surfactants

Many, although not all, toothpastes contain sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or related surfactants (detergents). SLS is found in many other personal care products as well, such as shampoo, and is mainly a foaming agent, which enables uniform distribution of toothpaste, improving its cleansing power.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, November 3, 2022

Ingredients of Toothpaste : Fluorides

Fluoride in various forms is the most popular and effective active ingredient in toothpaste to prevent cavities. Fluoride is present in small amounts in plants, animals, and some natural water sources. The additional fluoride in toothpaste has beneficial effects on the formation of dental enamel and bones. Sodium fluoride (NaF) is the most common source of fluoride, but stannous fluoride (SnF2), and sodium monofluorophosphate (Na2PO3F) are also used. At similar fluoride concentrations, toothpastes containing stannous fluoride have been shown to be more effective than toothpastes containing sodium fluoride for reducing the incidence of dental caries and dental erosion, as well as reducing gingivitis. Some stannous fluoride-containing toothpastes also contain ingredients that allow for better stain and calculus removal. A systematic review revealed stabilised stannous fluoride-containing toothpastes had a positive effect on the reduction of plaque, gingivitis and staining, with a significant reduction in calculus and halitosis compared to other toothpastes. Furthermore, numerous clinical trials have shown gluconate chelated stannous fluoride toothpastes possess superior protection against dental erosion and dentine hypersensitivity compared to other fluoride-containing and fluoride-free toothpastes.

Much of the toothpaste sold in the United States has 1,000 to 1,100 parts per million fluoride. In European countries, such as the UK or Greece, the fluoride content is often higher; a sodium fluoride content of 0.312% w/w (1,450 ppm fluoride) or stannous fluoride content of 0.454% w/w (1,100 ppm fluoride) is common. All of these concentrations are likely to prevent tooth decay, according to a 2019 Cochrane review. Concentrations below 1,000 ppm are not likely to be preventive, and the preventive effect increases with concentration. Clinical trials support the use of high fluoride (5,000 ppm fluoride) dentifrices, for prevention of root caries in elderly adults by reducing the amount of plaque accumulated, decreasing the number of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli and possibly promoting calcium fluoride deposits to a higher degree than after the use of traditional fluoride containing dentifrices.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, October 31, 2022

5 Dental Anesthesia Options & Everything You NEED to KNOW About Them


Let's talk about all the different types of dental anesthesia, including the benefits, side effects, and how long each one lasts!  We'll go over: local anesthetic (the numbing injection), nitrous oxide (aka laughing gas), oral sedation (medication such as pills), IV sedation (twilight), and general anesthesia.

The 5 types of dental anesthesia, side effects, efficacy, and who can offer them will vary from office to office. Not all dentists offer or are trained to provide the same types of dental sedation. Lighter options like local anesthetic and nitrous oxide are in most offices, whereas IV sedation or general anesthesia are typically used in oral surgery clinics and outpatient facilities. Your dentist can help you identify the best sedative/anesthesia for your situation. No two are alike! Always be sure to review your medical history and talk to your dental provider about the risks involved in the type of sedative you choose.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, October 28, 2022

Ingredients of Toothpaste : Abrasives

Abrasives constitute 8-20% of a typical toothpaste. These insoluble particles are designed to help remove plaque from the teeth. The removal of plaque inhibits the accumulation of tartar (calculus) helping to minimize the risk of gum disease. Representative abrasives include particles of aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3), calcium carbonate (CaCO3), magnesium carbonate(MgCo3), sodium bicarbonate, various calcium hydrogen phosphates, various silicas and zeolites, and hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH).

Abrasives, like the dental polishing agents used in dentists' offices, also cause a small amount of enamel erosion which is termed "polishing" action. Some brands contain powdered white mica, which acts as a mild abrasive, and also adds a cosmetically pleasing glittery shimmer to the paste. The polishing of teeth removes stains from tooth surfaces, but has not been shown to improve dental health over and above the effects of the removal of plaque and calculus.

The abrasive effect of toothpaste is indicated by its RDA value. Toothpastes with RDA values above 250 are potentially damaging to the surfaces of teeth. The American National Standards Institute and American Dental Association considers toothpastes with an RDA below 250 to be safe and effective for a lifetime of use.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, October 25, 2022

Toothpaste

Toothpaste is a paste or gel dentifrice used with a toothbrush to clean and maintain the aesthetics and health of teeth. Toothpaste is used to promote oral hygiene: it is an abrasive that aids in removing dental plaque and food from the teeth, assists in suppressing halitosis, and delivers active ingredients (most commonly fluoride) to help prevent tooth decay (dental caries) and gum disease (gingivitis). Owing to differences in composition and fluoride content, not all toothpastes are equally effective in maintaining oral health. The decline of tooth decay during the 20th century has been attributed to the introduction and regular use of fluoride-containing toothpastes worldwide. Large amounts of swallowed toothpaste can be toxic. Common colors for toothpaste include white (sometimes with colored stripes or green tint) and blue.

Toothpastes are generally useful to maintain dental health. Toothpastes containing fluoride are effective at preventing tooth decay. Toothpastes may also help to control and remove plaque build-up, promoting healthy gums. A 2016 systematic review indicated that using toothpaste when brushing the teeth does not necessarily impact the level of plaque removal. However, the active ingredients in toothpastes are able to prevent dental diseases with regular use.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, October 22, 2022

can you OVER BRUSH your teeth!?


Let's talk about what happens if you brush your teeth too much!

Brushing your teeth more often than the recommended two minutes twice a day is perfectly fine. But only as long as you’re not being overzealous and overbrushing. Teeth are hard but not indestructible. If you scrub too aggressively or use stiff toothbrush bristles, it’s only a matter of time before you do permanent damage to your teeth and gums.
 
If you’re having a hard time breaking an aggressive scrub-brushing habit, work with your dentist or hygienist to find a solution. It could be as simple as changing your toothbrush or the way you hold it. By brushing correctly (and not overbrushing teeth), you can prevent unnecessary tooth pain, aesthetic damage, or the need for restorative treatments later on down the road.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, October 19, 2022

Patient Services : Crowns

Crowns cover and strengthen broken or decayed teeth. Crowns look natural and give you a healthy smile. When the size of a filling exceeds a certain proportion of the tooth, it must be replaced with a cap also called a crown. Porcelain crowns look very natural and don’t have a dark metal line. They reflect light with a natural healthy glow. Porcelain crowns can make even the ugliest teeth look like a movie star smile!

New CEREC™ Restoration System

We now offer the newest in permanent restoration technology! With the new CEREC™ system, we can do crowns, onlay and inlay restoration procedures in just one office visit saving you both time and money!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, October 16, 2022

Patient Services : Whitening

Whiten your teeth to a healthy, younger look. As part of aging, your teeth yellow with time. Now, with the help of Dr. Burton, your teeth can be whitened safely and comfortably, in as little as two weeks. When done by a qualified dentist, this process has proven to be safe to your natural teeth and previous dental care. As you can see, tooth whitening can substantially improve the brightness of your smile. The below photo also includes the use of bonding to even out the teeth and fill gaps and chips.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com


Thursday, October 13, 2022

Is it Possible To Remove Tartar At Home


Let's talk about WHY it's NOT safe to attempt tartar removal yourself at-home, and HOW to properly remove plaque (since plaque IS what should be getting removed daily)!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, October 10, 2022

Patient Services : Fillings

Replace your old, blackened mercury fillings with the new, safe tooth-colored replacements. These advanced materials make your mouth look and feel natural and unscarred. All your teeth can look shiny and white with these new materials.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, October 7, 2022

Patient Services : Veneers


Veneers are the ultimate smile enhancement tool! They will strengthen and beautify your teeth. Painlessly repair broken, stained or crooked teeth with a natural enamel replacement. Veneers are often used for “instant” orthodontics. Repairing teeth due to injury or wear-even slight straightening- is quick, painless and affordable with today’s natural and long lasting materials. Veneers are like giving your smile a new wardrobe. Natural looking veneers can quickly repair even deeply stained or discolored teeth.


707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, October 4, 2022

How To Clean Retainers and Night Guards


In this video you'll learn how to properly clean and properly store your retainers (essix and hawley) and night guards AND how to keep them free of bad odors and staining.  DISCLAIMER: The best recommendations come directly from the manufacturer's instructions (the dentist or dental lab that fabricated your mouth piece) so ALWAYS ask their instructions in cleaning your mouth piece.  The instructions in this video are only generalized instructions, which may differ from one manufacturer to another.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Patient Services : Bonding


Composites or bonding is a tooth colored filling material that will fix chips, cracks and spaces so that you can have a great smile. Bonding is similar to sculpting individual teeth with a special tooth-like material that looks and feels like the real thing. It is an affordable, quick and painless way to repair many cosmetic flaws or injuries. Bonding can quickly fill in ugly gaps between teeth.

Visit our website and contact us today to see how we can make you smile.

1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687

707-453-1776

Sunday, September 25, 2022

can you OVER BRUSH your teeth!?


Let's talk about what happens if you brush your teeth too much!

Brushing your teeth more often than the recommended two minutes twice a day is perfectly fine. But only as long as you’re not being overzealous and overbrushing. Teeth are hard but not indestructible. If you scrub too aggressively or use stiff toothbrush bristles, it’s only a matter of time before you do permanent damage to your teeth and gums.
 
If you’re having a hard time breaking an aggressive scrub-brushing habit, work with your dentist or hygienist to find a solution. It could be as simple as changing your toothbrush or the way you hold it. By brushing correctly (and not overbrushing teeth), you can prevent unnecessary tooth pain, aesthetic damage, or the need for restorative treatments later on down the road.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, September 22, 2022

Patient Services : Bridges

Bridges are a series of crowns linked together to strengthen teeth that are weak. They are also used to replace missing teeth. Bridges are used to give you a great smile with no spaces and allow you to function properly.

Visit our website and contact us today to see how we can make you smile.

1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687

707-453-1776

Monday, September 19, 2022

Patient Services : Orthodontics


It's never too late to improve your smile. Braces can correct a wide range of problems, not just for your children but for you as well. Orthodontics may be the perfect way to the perfect smile.

Visit our website and contact us today to see how we can make you smile.

1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687

707-453-1776

Friday, September 16, 2022

Aging and Oral Health


Aging can affect your oral health, just as it does your overall health. With age, teeth may become darker or look dull and gums may begin to recede, which can lead to an increase in plaque. Learn more about the steps you can take to correct or minimize these and other age-related changes in your oral health.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Meet The Team

Dr. Burton graduated from Seaside High School, Seaside, CA in 1972. She earned her B.A. in biology from Yale University in 1976, and received her D.D.S. from New York University in 1980.

For more than 20 years, Dr. Burton has been providing high quality dental care with a gentle touch. She has practiced at the letterman Army Medical Center for the Department of Defense and she was clinical professor at Beth Israel Hospital and with the Children’s Aid Society in New York City.

Dr. Burton opened Regency Dental in 1995. She completed the Straight Wire Institute for orthodontic certification and the University of Phoenix Business Academy. She continues to attend various seminars and classes to stay informed and keep up to date on all the latest treatment techniques. One of her goals is to change people’s perception of dentistry by providing options to make dental care non-threatening and as pain free as possible.

Dr. Burton is very interested in the community and donates time and resources to school children and children’s sports teams in Vacaville, as well as participating in the Smiles For Life foundation charity every year for the last 10 years. She and her team have helped raise $4 million to help children’s charities across North America.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, September 10, 2022

Developmental Disturbances of Teeth

The absence of third molars is very common, occurring in 20–23% of the population, followed in prevalence by the second premolar and lateral incisor.

Anodontia is a complete lack of tooth development. It is rare, most often occurring in a condition called hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

Hypodontia is a lack of some tooth development (not including third molars). It is one of the most common developmental abnormalities, affecting 3.5–8.0% of the population. Hypodontia is often associated with the absence of a dental lamina, which is vulnerable to environmental forces like infection and chemotherapy medications. It is also associated with many syndromes, such as Down syndrome and Crouzon syndrome.

Hyperdontia is the development of extraneous teeth. It occurs in 1–3% of Caucasians and is more frequent in Asians. About 86% of these cases involve a single extra tooth in the mouth, most commonly found in the maxilla, where the incisors are located. Hyperdontia is believed to be associated with an excess of dental lamina.

Dilaceration is an abnormal bend found on a tooth, and is nearly always associated with trauma that moves the developing tooth bud. As a tooth is forming, a force can move the tooth from its original position, leaving the rest of the tooth to form at an abnormal angle. Cysts or tumors adjacent to a tooth bud are forces known to cause dilaceration, as are primary (baby) teeth pushed upward by trauma into the gingiva where it moves the tooth bud of the permanent tooth.

Enamel hypoplasia or hypomineralization is a defect of the teeth caused by a disturbance in the formation of the organic enamel matrix, clinically visible as enamel defects. It may be caused by nutritional factors, some diseases (such as undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease, chicken pox, congenital syphilis), hypocalcemia, fluoride ingestion, birth injury, preterm birth, infection or trauma from a deciduous tooth. In some circumstances enamel hypoplasia can be so severe that last sections of enamel is missing, exposing the underlying dentin.

Some systemic conditions may cause delayed tooth development, such as nutritional factors, endocrine disorders (hypothyroidism, hypopituitarism, hypoparathyroidism, pseudohypoparathyroidism), undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease, anemia, prematurity, low birth weight, renal failure, heavy metal intoxication or tobacco smoke, among others.

Regional odontodysplasia is rare, but is most likely to occur in the maxilla and anterior teeth. The cause is unknown; a number of causes have been postulated, including a disturbance in the neural crest cells, infection, radiation therapy, and a decrease in vascular supply (the most widely held hypothesis). Teeth affected by regional odontodysplasia nevAmelogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a defect in dental enamel formation. Teeth are often free of enamel, small, misshapen, and tinted brown. The cause of these deformities is due to a mutation in enamel in expression. Dental patients with this disease should be especially cautious and visit their dentist frequently.

Natal and neonatal teeth are an anomaly that involves teeth erupting in a newborn infant's mouth earlier than usual. The incidence ranges from 1:2,000 to 1:3,500 births. Natal teeth are more frequent, approximately three times more common than neonatal teeth. Some authors reported a higher prevalence in females than males. The most common location is the mandibular region of the central incisors. Natal teeth and neonatal teeth are associated with genetics, developmental abnormalities and certain recognized syndromes. Additional names for this condition include precocious dentition, baby teeth, and milk teeth.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, September 7, 2022

A New Day for Dentistry: Dr. Nicole McGrath-Barnes on Mentorship and Rep...


Dr. Nicole McGrath–Barnes found her passion for dentistry at the age of 15, after finding an opening for a dental assistant position in the help wanted pages. Unaware of the qualification requirements, she went in to apply. That dentist became her mentor. Witnessing his empathy and compassion inspired Dr. McGrath-Barnes to become a dentist herself and to make an impact in her community.
 
Our community has the power to influence what’s next for dentistry – a profession that reflects and celebrates everyone’s unique talents and voices. It’s a new day for dentistry. Let’s build it together.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, September 4, 2022

Nutrition and Tooth Development

As in other aspects of human growth and development, nutrition has an effect on the developing tooth. Essential nutrients for a healthy tooth include calcium, phosphorus, and vitamins A, C, and D. Calcium and phosphorus are needed to properly form the hydroxyapatite crystals, and their levels in the blood are maintained by Vitamin D. Vitamin A is necessary for the formation of keratin, as Vitamin C is for collagen. Fluoride, although not a nutrient, is incorporated into the hydroxyapatite crystal of a developing tooth and bones. The dental theory is the low levels of fluoride incorporation and very mild fluorosis makes the tooth more resistant to demineralization and subsequent decay.

Deficiencies of nutrients can have a wide range of effects on tooth development. In situations where calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D are deficient, the hard structures of a tooth may be less mineralized. A lack of vitamin A can cause a reduction in the amount of enamel formation.

Fluoride ingestion has been noted to delay eruption of teeth for as much as a year or more from the accepted eruption dates since the initial 1940s fluoridation trials. Researchers theorize that the delay is a manifestation of fluoride's depressing impact on thyroid hormones. The delay in eruption has been suggested as the reason for the apparent difference in decay among the youngest children. Fluoride ingestion during tooth development can lead to a permanent condition known as fluorosis with varying levels of severity, the result of fluoride's interference with the normal osteoblast development.

Undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease often causes dental enamel defects and can be the only manifestation of the disease, in absence of gastrointestinal symptoms or malabsorption signs.

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a hormone-disrupting chemical that has been implicated in having negative effects on human health, including, but not limited to, fetal development. As shown in animal studies which mimic human enamel, the mother's consumption of products with BPA during pregnancy can lead to the child's tooth development being obstructed. Those children are shown to be prone to incisor and first molar hypomineralization, a weakened state of the enamel. Additionally, it is most important for mother's to avoid BPA during pregnancy, but also avoid BPA-use in the child's products up to five months of age.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, September 1, 2022

Patient Services : Crowns

Crowns cover and strengthen broken or decayed teeth. Crowns look natural and give you a healthy smile. When the size of a filling exceeds a certain proportion of the tooth, it must be replaced with a cap also called a crown. Porcelain crowns look very natural and don’t have a dark metal line. They reflect light with a natural healthy glow. Porcelain crowns can make even the ugliest teeth look like a movie star smile!

New CEREC™ Restoration System

We now offer the newest in permanent restoration technology! With the new CEREC™ system, we can do crowns, onlay and inlay restoration procedures in just one office visit saving you both time and money!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tooth Eruption

Tooth eruption occurs when the teeth enter the mouth and become visible. Although researchers agree that tooth eruption is a complex process, there is little agreement on the identity of the mechanism that controls eruption. Some commonly held theories that have been disproven over time include: (1) the tooth is pushed upward into the mouth by the growth of the tooth's root, (2) the tooth is pushed upward by the growth of the bone around the tooth, (3) the tooth is pushed upward by vascular pressure, and (4) the tooth is pushed upward by the cushioned hammock. The cushioned hammock theory, first proposed by Harry Sicher, was taught widely from the 1930s to the 1950s. This theory postulated that a ligament below a tooth, which Sicher observed under a microscope on a histologic slide, was responsible for eruption. Later, the "ligament" Sicher observed was determined to be merely an artifact created in the process of preparing the slide.

The most widely held current theory is that while several forces might be involved in eruption, the periodontal ligaments provide the main impetus for the process. Theorists hypothesize that the periodontal ligaments promote eruption through the shrinking and cross-linking of their collagen fibers and the contraction of their fibroblasts.

Although tooth eruption occurs at different times for different people, a general eruption timeline exists. Typically, humans have 20 primary (baby) teeth and 32 permanent teeth. Tooth eruption has three stages. The first, known as deciduous dentition stage, occurs when only primary teeth are visible. Once the first permanent tooth erupts into the mouth, the teeth are in the mixed (or transitional) dentition. After the last primary tooth falls out of the mouth—a process known as exfoliation—the teeth are in the permanent dentition.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, August 29, 2022

What is Mouth Breathing & How to STOP Mouth Breathing


Let's talk about why mouth breathing is AWFUL for your dental health! 

Typically, your mouth needs plenty of saliva to stay healthy. An adequate saliva flow helps to limit the accumulation of bacteria, dry tissues, and even odors. When someone is always breathing through their mouth instead of their nose—say for the occasional hard workout at the gym—it dries out your saliva quicker than it can replenish itself.
 
The more you breathe out your mouth, the drier your mouth becomes. And the drier your mouth is, the higher your chances are for:
 
• Cavities
• Halitosis
• Gum disease
• Dry, cracked lips
 
In fact, in dentistry we purposely try to treat and manage dry mouth, because it’s that bad for your tooth enamel. Without saliva coating your teeth throughout the day, your bacterial and acid levels skyrocket. Chronic mouth breathing can—and almost always will—lead to an uptick in dental diseases. You could almost equate mouth breathing to being as bad on your teeth and gums as what we see with cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. It’s a huge factor in your dental wellness, not just a minor knit-picky issue.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, August 26, 2022

Formation of the Periodontium : Periodontal Ligament


Cells from the dental follicle give rise to the periodontal ligament (PDL). Specific events leading to the formation of the periodontal ligament vary between deciduous (baby) and permanent teeth and among various species of animals. Nonetheless, formation of the periodontal ligament begins with ligament fibroblasts from the dental follicle. These fibroblasts secrete collagen, which interacts with fibers on the surfaces of adjacent bone and cementum.

This interaction leads to an attachment that develops as the tooth erupts into the mouth. The occlusion, which is the arrangement of teeth and how teeth in opposite arches come in contact with one another, continually affects the formation of periodontal ligament. This perpetual creation of periodontal ligament leads to the formation of groups of fibers in different orientations, such as horizontal and oblique fibers.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, August 23, 2022

Formation of the Periodontium

The periodontium, which is the supporting structure of a tooth, consists of the cementum, periodontal ligaments, gingiva, and alveolar bone. Cementum is the only one of these that is a part of a tooth. Alveolar bone surrounds the roots of teeth to provide support and creates what is commonly called a "socket". Periodontal ligaments connect the alveolar bone to the cementum, and the gingiva is the surrounding tissue visible in the mouth.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, August 20, 2022

Xylitol vs Fluoride | Can Xylitol REPLACE Fluoride?


Let's talk about the benefits of xylitol versus the benefits of fluoride -- and how xylitol is NOT an effective replacement of fluoride in toothpaste.

Xylitol is a popular alternative for people looking for healthy ways to improve their oral health in general. But it doesn’t replace the need for fluoride. You see, fluoride contains hydroxyapatite crystals.  These tiny granules work to create a stronger, smoother surface on your tooth enamel and make your teeth less prone to decay. Essentially, they strengthen weak teeth to make them more resistant to acids.
 
On the other hand, xylitol helps repel plaque by preventing it from accumulating on teeth to begin with. It doesn’t remineralize enamel that has already been coated with buildup. So, although both xylitol and fluoride can be used for preventative purposes, they serve two totally different goals. A lot of dentists and hygienists recommend pairing both of them together for optimal results. One repels the plaque, the other repairs the areas damaged by it (before cavities start.)

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, August 17, 2022

Hard Tissue Formation : Cementum


Cementum formation is called cementogenesis and occurs late in the development of teeth. Cementoblasts are the cells responsible for cementogenesis. Two types of cementum form: cellular and acellular.

Acellular cementum forms first. The cementoblasts differentiate from follicular cells, which can only reach the surface of the tooth's root once Hertwig's Epithelial Root Sheath (HERS) has begun to deteriorate. The cementoblasts secrete fine collagen fibrils along the root surface at right angles before migrating away from the tooth. As the cementoblasts move, more collagen is deposited to lengthen and thicken the bundles of fibers. Noncollagenous proteins, such as bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin, are also secreted. Acellular cementum contains a secreted matrix of proteins and fibers. As mineralization takes place, the cementoblasts move away from the cementum, and the fibers left along the surface eventually join the forming periodontal ligaments.

Cellular cementum develops after most of the tooth formation is complete and after the tooth occludes (in contact) with a tooth in the opposite arch. This type of cementum forms around the fiber bundles of the periodontal ligaments. The cementoblasts forming cellular cementum become trapped in the cementum they produce.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, August 14, 2022

Hard Tissue Formation : Dentin

Dentin formation, known as dentinogenesis, is the first identifiable feature in the crown stage of tooth development. The formation of dentin must always occur before the formation of enamel. The different stages of dentin formation result in different types of dentin: mantle dentin, primary dentin, secondary dentin, and tertiary dentin.

Odontoblasts, the dentin-forming cells, differentiate from cells of the dental papilla. They begin secreting an organic matrix around the area directly adjacent to the inner enamel epithelium, closest to the area of the future cusp of a tooth. The organic matrix contains collagen fibers with large diameters (0.1–0.2 μm in diameter). The odontoblasts begin to move toward the center of the tooth, forming an extension called the odontoblast process. Thus, dentin formation proceeds toward the inside of the tooth. The odontoblast process causes the secretion of hydroxyapatite crystals and mineralization of the matrix. This area of mineralization is known as mantle dentin and is a layer usually about 150 μm thick.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, August 11, 2022

can TOOTHPASTE really WHITEN teeth?


Let's talk about whether or not toothpaste actually whitens teeth!  We'll also dive into charcoal toothpastes, purple toothpastes, and more!

Does whitening toothpaste work? When it comes to preventing new stains and keeping your smile white (after a professional whitening treatment), yes. It’s perfect for minimizing new surface stains from coffee, tea, etc. Does charcoal toothpaste work? Depending on the type, also yes. But some are too abrasive and they can cause gum recession and enamel abrasion, making long-term tooth stain even worse. If you really want whiter teeth, talk to your dentist about getting them treated in-office. And always, always, always work with your dental team when you’re choosing which whitening products to use. They are not created equal!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, August 8, 2022

Hard Tissue Formation : Enamel


Enamel formation is called amelogenesis and occurs in the crown stage (advanced bell stage) of tooth development. "Reciprocal induction" governs the relationship between the formation of dentin and enamel; dentin formation must always occur before enamel formation. Generally, enamel formation occurs in two stages: the secretory and maturation stages. Proteins and an organic matrix form a partially mineralized enamel in the secretory stage; the maturation stage completes enamel mineralization.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, August 5, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Advanced Bell Stage


Hard tissues, including enamel and dentin, develop during the next stage of tooth development. This stage is called the crown, or maturation stage, by some researchers. Important cellular changes occur at this time. In prior stages, all of the IEE cells were dividing to increase the overall size of the tooth bud, but rapid dividing, called mitosis, stops during the crown stage at the location where the cusps of the teeth form. The first mineralized hard tissues form at this location. At the same time, the IEE cells change in shape from cuboidal to columnar and become preameloblasts. The nuclei of these cells move closer to the stratum intermedium and away from the dental papilla as they become polarized.

The adjacent layer of cells in the dental papilla suddenly increases in size and differentiates into odontoblasts, which are the cells that form dentin. Researchers believe that the odontoblasts would not form if it were not for the changes occurring in the IEE. As the changes to the IEE and the formation of odontoblasts continue from the tips of the cusps, the odontoblasts secrete a substance, an organic matrix, into their immediate surrounding. The organic matrix contains the material needed for dentin formation. As odontoblasts deposit organic matrix termed predentin, they migrate toward the center of the dental papilla. Thus, unlike enamel, dentin starts forming in the surface closest to the outside of the tooth and proceeds inward. Cytoplasmic extensions are left behind as the odontoblasts move inward. The unique, tubular microscopic appearance of dentin is a result of the formation of dentin around these extensions.

After dentin formation begins, the cells of the IEE secrete an organic matrix against the dentin. This matrix immediately mineralizes and becomes the initial layer of the tooth's enamel. Outside the dentin are the newly formed ameloblasts in response to the formation of dentin, which are cells that continue the process of enamel formation; therefore, enamel formation moves outwards, adding new material to the outer surface of the developing tooth.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, August 2, 2022

What Do BROWN SPOTS on Your Teeth Mean?


Let's talk about the different reasons you have brown spots on your teeth!  And how to get rid of them!

Do you have teeth with brown stains on them? Aside from discoloration, are you also suffering from sensitivity or toothaches? Having brown spots on teeth can be a cosmetic concern, but it could also indicate that a tooth is dying or had a cavity. Larger areas of decay tend to be brown, while early stages look more like white spots. An exam and X-ray will quickly determine the cause of the dark spots on your teeth and if it’s something you need to worry about.

Your dentist can let you know if the brown stain is something that’s safe enough to bleach away with a whitening product, or if you require some type of physical treatment, such as a filling. If whitening is an option, the product can help you erase more internal tooth stain and keep new discoloration at bay (as long as you use your whitening kit for maintenance purposes.)

Bottom line make it a habit to see your dentist on a regular basis (at least twice a year) to have your teeth cleaned. This will give you a brighter smile so that if problems do pop up between visits, they’re easier and quicker to diagnose.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, July 30, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Bell Stage


The bell stage is known for the histodifferentiation and morphodifferentiation that takes place. The dental organ is bell-shaped during this stage, and the majority of its cells are called stellate reticulum because of their star-shaped appearance. The bell stage is divided into the early bell stage and the late bell stage. Cells on the periphery of the enamel organ separate into four important layers. Cuboidal cells on the periphery of the dental organ are known as outer enamel epithelium (OEE). The columnar cells of the enamel organ adjacent to the enamel papilla are known as inner enamel epithelium (IEE). The cells between the IEE and the stellate reticulum form a layer known as the stratum intermedium. The rim of the enamel organ where the outer and inner enamel epithelium join is called the cervical loop.

In summary, the layers in order of innermost to outermost consist of dentin, enamel (formed by IEE, or 'ameloblasts', as they move outwards/upwards), inner enamel epithelium and stratum intermedium (stratified cells that support the synthetic activity of the inner enamel epithelium) What follows is part of the initial 'enamel organ', the center of which is made up of stellate reticulum cells that serve to protect the enamel organ. This is all encased by the OEE layer.

Other events occur during the bell stage. The dental lamina disintegrates, leaving the developing teeth completely separated from the epithelium of the oral cavity; the two will not join again until the final eruption of the tooth into the mouth.

The crown of the tooth, which is influenced by the shape of the inner enamel epithelium, also takes shape during this stage. Throughout the mouth, all teeth undergo this same process; it is still uncertain why teeth form various crown shapes—for instance, incisors versus canines. There are two dominant hypotheses. The "field model" proposes there are components for each type of tooth shape found in the ectomesenchyme during tooth development. The components for particular types of teeth, such as incisors, are localized in one area and dissipate rapidly in different parts of the mouth. Thus, for example, the "incisor field" has factors that develop teeth into incisor shape, and this field is concentrated in the central incisor area, but decreases rapidly in the canine area.

The other dominant hypothesis, the "clone model", proposes that the epithelium programs a group of ectomesenchymal cells to generate teeth of particular shapes. This group of cells, called a clone, coaxes the dental lamina into tooth development, causing a tooth bud to form. Growth of the dental lamina continues in an area called the "progress zone". Once the progress zone travels a certain distance from the first tooth bud, a second tooth bud will start to develop. These two models are not necessarily mutually exclusive, nor does widely accepted dental science consider them to be so: it is postulated that both models influence tooth development at different times.

Other structures that may appear in a developing tooth in this stage are enamel knots, enamel cords, and enamel niche.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, July 27, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Cap Stage

The first signs of an arrangement of cells in the tooth bud occur in the cap stage. A small group of ectomesenchymal cells stops producing extracellular substances, which results in an aggregation of these cells called the dental papilla. At this point, the tooth bud grows around the ectomesenchymal aggregation, taking on the appearance of a cap, and becomes the enamel (or dental) organ covering the dental papilla. A condensation of ectomesenchymal cells called the dental sac or follicle surrounds the enamel organ and limits the dental papilla. Eventually, the enamel organ will produce enamel, the dental papilla will produce dentin and pulp, and the dental sac will produce all the supporting structures of a tooth, the periodontium.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, July 24, 2022

EVERYONE Does THIS Wrong When Brushing Teeth


Let's talk about the DOs and DON'Ts of brushing your teeth :)

You might be brushing your teeth twice a day already, but do you know how to properly brush your teeth? A lot of people think that they do, but they’re actually doing it wrong. When you brush your teeth incorrectly, it can damage your gums or lead to extra tartar buildup and tooth decay. Although I’m a big advocate of electric toothbrushes, most people still use a manual brush. If so, this toothbrushing guide is for you!

Technically, when it comes down to how to properly brush your teeth, you want to be spending at least two minutes. If you time yourself, you’re probably not even doing half of that. Most people only brush for about 30-45 seconds! If you don’t spend the time you need to get your teeth clean, that plaque and tartar buildup will start to catch up with you and cause tooth decay.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, July 21, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Bud Stage

The bud stage is characterized by the appearance of a tooth bud without a clear arrangement of cells. The stage technically begins once epithelial cells proliferate into the ectomesenchyme of the jaw. Typically, this occurs when the fetus is around 8 weeks old. The tooth bud itself is the group of cells at the periphery of the dental lamina.

Along with the formation of the dental lamina, 10 round epithelial structures, each referred to as a bud, develop at the distal aspect of the dental lamina of each arch. These correspond to the 10 primary teeth of each dental arch, and they signify the bud stage of tooth development. Each bud is separated from the ectomesenchyme by a basement membrane. Ectomesenchymal cells congregate deep to the bud, forming a cluster of cells, which is the initiation of the condensation of the ectomesenchyme. The remaining ectomesenchymal cells are arranged in a more or less haphazardly uniform fashion.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, July 18, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Stages

Tooth development is commonly divided into the following stages: the initiation stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, the bell stage, and finally maturation. The staging of tooth development is an attempt to categorize changes that take place along a continuum; frequently it is difficult to decide what stage should be assigned to a particular developing tooth. This determination is further complicated by the varying appearance of different histologic sections of the same developing tooth, which can appear to be different stages.

Initiation Stage
One of the earliest signs in the formation of a tooth that can be seen microscopically is the distinction between the vestibular lamina and the dental lamina. It occurs in the sixth to seventh week of the embryonic life. The dental lamina connects the developing tooth bud to the epithelial layer of the mouth for a significant time. This is regarded as the initiation stage.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, July 15, 2022

Dental Terminology (How To Understand Your Dentist)


It can be super confusing trying to understand what your dentist or dental hygienist is saying during your appointment.  Some patients say it sounds like we are speaking in code!  By using specific dental vocabulary - it helps dental professionals to more accurately communicate exactly what they see in your mouth.  This video gives you tips and tricks on how to decipher this descriptive dental vocabulary/jargon/language :)

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, July 12, 2022

Human Tooth Development


Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the mouth. For human teeth to have a healthy oral environment, all parts of the tooth must develop during appropriate stages of fetal development. Primary (baby) teeth start to form between the sixth and eighth week of prenatal development, and permanent teeth begin to form in the twentieth week. If teeth do not start to develop at or near these times, they will not develop at all, resulting in hypodontia or anodontia.

A significant amount of research has focused on determining the processes that initiate tooth development. It is widely accepted that there is a factor within the tissues of the first pharyngeal arch that is necessary for the development of teeth.

Tooth development is commonly divided into the following stages: the initiation stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, the bell stage, and finally maturation. The staging of tooth development is an attempt to categorize changes that take place along a continuum; frequently it is difficult to decide what stage should be assigned to a particular developing tooth. This determination is further complicated by the varying appearance of different histologic sections of the same developing tooth, which can appear to be different stages.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, July 9, 2022

Ameloblasts


Ameloblasts are cells present only during tooth development that deposit tooth enamel, which is the hard outermost layer of the tooth forming the surface of the crown.

Each ameloblast is a columnar cell approximately 4 micrometers in diameter, 40 micrometers in length and is hexagonal in cross section. The secretory end of the ameloblast ends in a six-sided pyramid-like projection known as the Tomes' process. The angulation of the Tomes' process is significant in the orientation of enamel rods, the basic unit of tooth enamel. Distal terminal bars are junctional complexes that separate the Tomes' processes from ameloblast proper.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com