Sunday, August 14, 2022

Hard Tissue Formation : Dentin

Dentin formation, known as dentinogenesis, is the first identifiable feature in the crown stage of tooth development. The formation of dentin must always occur before the formation of enamel. The different stages of dentin formation result in different types of dentin: mantle dentin, primary dentin, secondary dentin, and tertiary dentin.

Odontoblasts, the dentin-forming cells, differentiate from cells of the dental papilla. They begin secreting an organic matrix around the area directly adjacent to the inner enamel epithelium, closest to the area of the future cusp of a tooth. The organic matrix contains collagen fibers with large diameters (0.1–0.2 μm in diameter). The odontoblasts begin to move toward the center of the tooth, forming an extension called the odontoblast process. Thus, dentin formation proceeds toward the inside of the tooth. The odontoblast process causes the secretion of hydroxyapatite crystals and mineralization of the matrix. This area of mineralization is known as mantle dentin and is a layer usually about 150 μm thick.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, August 11, 2022

can TOOTHPASTE really WHITEN teeth?


Let's talk about whether or not toothpaste actually whitens teeth!  We'll also dive into charcoal toothpastes, purple toothpastes, and more!

Does whitening toothpaste work? When it comes to preventing new stains and keeping your smile white (after a professional whitening treatment), yes. It’s perfect for minimizing new surface stains from coffee, tea, etc. Does charcoal toothpaste work? Depending on the type, also yes. But some are too abrasive and they can cause gum recession and enamel abrasion, making long-term tooth stain even worse. If you really want whiter teeth, talk to your dentist about getting them treated in-office. And always, always, always work with your dental team when you’re choosing which whitening products to use. They are not created equal!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, August 8, 2022

Hard Tissue Formation : Enamel


Enamel formation is called amelogenesis and occurs in the crown stage (advanced bell stage) of tooth development. "Reciprocal induction" governs the relationship between the formation of dentin and enamel; dentin formation must always occur before enamel formation. Generally, enamel formation occurs in two stages: the secretory and maturation stages. Proteins and an organic matrix form a partially mineralized enamel in the secretory stage; the maturation stage completes enamel mineralization.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, August 5, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Advanced Bell Stage


Hard tissues, including enamel and dentin, develop during the next stage of tooth development. This stage is called the crown, or maturation stage, by some researchers. Important cellular changes occur at this time. In prior stages, all of the IEE cells were dividing to increase the overall size of the tooth bud, but rapid dividing, called mitosis, stops during the crown stage at the location where the cusps of the teeth form. The first mineralized hard tissues form at this location. At the same time, the IEE cells change in shape from cuboidal to columnar and become preameloblasts. The nuclei of these cells move closer to the stratum intermedium and away from the dental papilla as they become polarized.

The adjacent layer of cells in the dental papilla suddenly increases in size and differentiates into odontoblasts, which are the cells that form dentin. Researchers believe that the odontoblasts would not form if it were not for the changes occurring in the IEE. As the changes to the IEE and the formation of odontoblasts continue from the tips of the cusps, the odontoblasts secrete a substance, an organic matrix, into their immediate surrounding. The organic matrix contains the material needed for dentin formation. As odontoblasts deposit organic matrix termed predentin, they migrate toward the center of the dental papilla. Thus, unlike enamel, dentin starts forming in the surface closest to the outside of the tooth and proceeds inward. Cytoplasmic extensions are left behind as the odontoblasts move inward. The unique, tubular microscopic appearance of dentin is a result of the formation of dentin around these extensions.

After dentin formation begins, the cells of the IEE secrete an organic matrix against the dentin. This matrix immediately mineralizes and becomes the initial layer of the tooth's enamel. Outside the dentin are the newly formed ameloblasts in response to the formation of dentin, which are cells that continue the process of enamel formation; therefore, enamel formation moves outwards, adding new material to the outer surface of the developing tooth.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, August 2, 2022

What Do BROWN SPOTS on Your Teeth Mean?


Let's talk about the different reasons you have brown spots on your teeth!  And how to get rid of them!

Do you have teeth with brown stains on them? Aside from discoloration, are you also suffering from sensitivity or toothaches? Having brown spots on teeth can be a cosmetic concern, but it could also indicate that a tooth is dying or had a cavity. Larger areas of decay tend to be brown, while early stages look more like white spots. An exam and X-ray will quickly determine the cause of the dark spots on your teeth and if it’s something you need to worry about.

Your dentist can let you know if the brown stain is something that’s safe enough to bleach away with a whitening product, or if you require some type of physical treatment, such as a filling. If whitening is an option, the product can help you erase more internal tooth stain and keep new discoloration at bay (as long as you use your whitening kit for maintenance purposes.)

Bottom line make it a habit to see your dentist on a regular basis (at least twice a year) to have your teeth cleaned. This will give you a brighter smile so that if problems do pop up between visits, they’re easier and quicker to diagnose.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, July 30, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Bell Stage


The bell stage is known for the histodifferentiation and morphodifferentiation that takes place. The dental organ is bell-shaped during this stage, and the majority of its cells are called stellate reticulum because of their star-shaped appearance. The bell stage is divided into the early bell stage and the late bell stage. Cells on the periphery of the enamel organ separate into four important layers. Cuboidal cells on the periphery of the dental organ are known as outer enamel epithelium (OEE). The columnar cells of the enamel organ adjacent to the enamel papilla are known as inner enamel epithelium (IEE). The cells between the IEE and the stellate reticulum form a layer known as the stratum intermedium. The rim of the enamel organ where the outer and inner enamel epithelium join is called the cervical loop.

In summary, the layers in order of innermost to outermost consist of dentin, enamel (formed by IEE, or 'ameloblasts', as they move outwards/upwards), inner enamel epithelium and stratum intermedium (stratified cells that support the synthetic activity of the inner enamel epithelium) What follows is part of the initial 'enamel organ', the center of which is made up of stellate reticulum cells that serve to protect the enamel organ. This is all encased by the OEE layer.

Other events occur during the bell stage. The dental lamina disintegrates, leaving the developing teeth completely separated from the epithelium of the oral cavity; the two will not join again until the final eruption of the tooth into the mouth.

The crown of the tooth, which is influenced by the shape of the inner enamel epithelium, also takes shape during this stage. Throughout the mouth, all teeth undergo this same process; it is still uncertain why teeth form various crown shapes—for instance, incisors versus canines. There are two dominant hypotheses. The "field model" proposes there are components for each type of tooth shape found in the ectomesenchyme during tooth development. The components for particular types of teeth, such as incisors, are localized in one area and dissipate rapidly in different parts of the mouth. Thus, for example, the "incisor field" has factors that develop teeth into incisor shape, and this field is concentrated in the central incisor area, but decreases rapidly in the canine area.

The other dominant hypothesis, the "clone model", proposes that the epithelium programs a group of ectomesenchymal cells to generate teeth of particular shapes. This group of cells, called a clone, coaxes the dental lamina into tooth development, causing a tooth bud to form. Growth of the dental lamina continues in an area called the "progress zone". Once the progress zone travels a certain distance from the first tooth bud, a second tooth bud will start to develop. These two models are not necessarily mutually exclusive, nor does widely accepted dental science consider them to be so: it is postulated that both models influence tooth development at different times.

Other structures that may appear in a developing tooth in this stage are enamel knots, enamel cords, and enamel niche.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, July 27, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Cap Stage

The first signs of an arrangement of cells in the tooth bud occur in the cap stage. A small group of ectomesenchymal cells stops producing extracellular substances, which results in an aggregation of these cells called the dental papilla. At this point, the tooth bud grows around the ectomesenchymal aggregation, taking on the appearance of a cap, and becomes the enamel (or dental) organ covering the dental papilla. A condensation of ectomesenchymal cells called the dental sac or follicle surrounds the enamel organ and limits the dental papilla. Eventually, the enamel organ will produce enamel, the dental papilla will produce dentin and pulp, and the dental sac will produce all the supporting structures of a tooth, the periodontium.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, July 24, 2022

EVERYONE Does THIS Wrong When Brushing Teeth


Let's talk about the DOs and DON'Ts of brushing your teeth :)

You might be brushing your teeth twice a day already, but do you know how to properly brush your teeth? A lot of people think that they do, but they’re actually doing it wrong. When you brush your teeth incorrectly, it can damage your gums or lead to extra tartar buildup and tooth decay. Although I’m a big advocate of electric toothbrushes, most people still use a manual brush. If so, this toothbrushing guide is for you!

Technically, when it comes down to how to properly brush your teeth, you want to be spending at least two minutes. If you time yourself, you’re probably not even doing half of that. Most people only brush for about 30-45 seconds! If you don’t spend the time you need to get your teeth clean, that plaque and tartar buildup will start to catch up with you and cause tooth decay.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, July 21, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Bud Stage

The bud stage is characterized by the appearance of a tooth bud without a clear arrangement of cells. The stage technically begins once epithelial cells proliferate into the ectomesenchyme of the jaw. Typically, this occurs when the fetus is around 8 weeks old. The tooth bud itself is the group of cells at the periphery of the dental lamina.

Along with the formation of the dental lamina, 10 round epithelial structures, each referred to as a bud, develop at the distal aspect of the dental lamina of each arch. These correspond to the 10 primary teeth of each dental arch, and they signify the bud stage of tooth development. Each bud is separated from the ectomesenchyme by a basement membrane. Ectomesenchymal cells congregate deep to the bud, forming a cluster of cells, which is the initiation of the condensation of the ectomesenchyme. The remaining ectomesenchymal cells are arranged in a more or less haphazardly uniform fashion.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, July 18, 2022

Human Tooth Development : Stages

Tooth development is commonly divided into the following stages: the initiation stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, the bell stage, and finally maturation. The staging of tooth development is an attempt to categorize changes that take place along a continuum; frequently it is difficult to decide what stage should be assigned to a particular developing tooth. This determination is further complicated by the varying appearance of different histologic sections of the same developing tooth, which can appear to be different stages.

Initiation Stage
One of the earliest signs in the formation of a tooth that can be seen microscopically is the distinction between the vestibular lamina and the dental lamina. It occurs in the sixth to seventh week of the embryonic life. The dental lamina connects the developing tooth bud to the epithelial layer of the mouth for a significant time. This is regarded as the initiation stage.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, July 15, 2022

Dental Terminology (How To Understand Your Dentist)


It can be super confusing trying to understand what your dentist or dental hygienist is saying during your appointment.  Some patients say it sounds like we are speaking in code!  By using specific dental vocabulary - it helps dental professionals to more accurately communicate exactly what they see in your mouth.  This video gives you tips and tricks on how to decipher this descriptive dental vocabulary/jargon/language :)

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, July 12, 2022

Human Tooth Development


Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the mouth. For human teeth to have a healthy oral environment, all parts of the tooth must develop during appropriate stages of fetal development. Primary (baby) teeth start to form between the sixth and eighth week of prenatal development, and permanent teeth begin to form in the twentieth week. If teeth do not start to develop at or near these times, they will not develop at all, resulting in hypodontia or anodontia.

A significant amount of research has focused on determining the processes that initiate tooth development. It is widely accepted that there is a factor within the tissues of the first pharyngeal arch that is necessary for the development of teeth.

Tooth development is commonly divided into the following stages: the initiation stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, the bell stage, and finally maturation. The staging of tooth development is an attempt to categorize changes that take place along a continuum; frequently it is difficult to decide what stage should be assigned to a particular developing tooth. This determination is further complicated by the varying appearance of different histologic sections of the same developing tooth, which can appear to be different stages.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, July 9, 2022

Ameloblasts


Ameloblasts are cells present only during tooth development that deposit tooth enamel, which is the hard outermost layer of the tooth forming the surface of the crown.

Each ameloblast is a columnar cell approximately 4 micrometers in diameter, 40 micrometers in length and is hexagonal in cross section. The secretory end of the ameloblast ends in a six-sided pyramid-like projection known as the Tomes' process. The angulation of the Tomes' process is significant in the orientation of enamel rods, the basic unit of tooth enamel. Distal terminal bars are junctional complexes that separate the Tomes' processes from ameloblast proper.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Why Are My Teeth TRANSLUCENT & How to FIX It 🦷


Let's talk about the reasons why your teeth may appear translucent and what to do about it!

Teeth are usually glossy looking and have some type of a sheen to them - transparency actually isn't the "normal look" for teeth. But if you have significant enamel damage, it can look like you have translucent teeth. Some translucency—especially along the biting edges of your front teeth—isn’t all that abnormal. But when we have translucency on a large scale, it’s usually due to something physically happening to your teeth that’s causing structural damage to them.

Generally speaking, dentists and dental lab technicians actually want some translucency when it comes to repairing broken teeth. That’s why certain types of porcelains or ceramics are recommended for repairing your “smile zone.” If the material was completely opaque, it would stand out and look unnatural.
To understand why teeth look translucent or clear, we have to first break down the layers of a tooth structure. First, we have the enamel which is the outermost coating or “shell” that goes around the crown of your tooth (the part that isn’t covered by gum tissue.) Enamel is some shade of white and is more transparent than any of the other tooth structures. 

Next is dentin. Dentin makes up the bulk of your tooth. It’s the part under the enamel and that composes the majority of your tooth root. Dentin is yellow. Its shade and density impact the overall color of your teeth.

Cementum is an extremely thin layer that goes over the dentin on the root portion (not the crown.) You typically cannot see it, but microscopically it’s there.

Out of all three of these layers, enamel is the most transparent. While it’s not typically “see-through”, it does have some transparency to it in that light can shine through or bounce off of the structure. It’s not completely rock solid to the point where light can’t penetrate that area.

If you have more translucent teeth than someone else, or you notice that your teeth are starting to be more clear than they used to be, it means some type of physical change is going on with these tooth structures.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, July 3, 2022

Tooth Enamel : Other Mammals & Other Organisms


Other Mammals
For the most part, research has shown that the formation of tooth enamel in animals is almost identical to formation in humans. The enamel organ, including the dental papilla, and ameloblasts function similarly. The variations of enamel that are present are infrequent but sometimes important. Differences exist, certainly, in the morphology, number, and types of teeth among animals.

Dogs are less likely than humans to have tooth decay due to the high pH of dog saliva, which prevents an acidic environment from forming and the subsequent demineralization of enamel which would occur. In the event that tooth decay does occur (usually from trauma), dogs can receive dental fillings just as humans do. Similar to human teeth, the enamel of dogs is vulnerable to tetracycline staining. Consequently, this risk must be accounted for when tetracycline antibiotic therapy is administered to young dogs. Enamel hypoplasia may also occur in dogs.

The mineral distribution in rodent enamel is different from that of monkeys, dogs, pigs, and humans. In horse teeth, the enamel and dentin layers are intertwined with each other, which increases the strength and wear resistance of those teeth.

Other Organisms
Enamel or enameloid is found in the dermal denticles of sharks and many early vertebrates, and it appeared there before gnathostome teeth evolved. The ganoin that covers the scales of many actinopterygians is probably derived from enamel. Enamel-like substances also coat the jaws of some crustacea, but this is not homologous with vertebrate enamel. Enameloid covers some fish scales.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, June 30, 2022

Enamel Loss

The high mineral content of enamel, which makes this tissue the hardest in the human body, also makes it demineralize in a process that often occurs as dental caries, otherwise known as cavities. Demineralization occurs for several reasons, but the most important cause of tooth decay is the ingestion of fermentable carbohydrates.[citation needed] Tooth cavities are caused when acids dissolve tooth enamel: Enamel is also lost through tooth wear and enamel fractures.

Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2(s) + 8H+(aq) → 10Ca2+(aq) + 6HPO42−(aq) + 2H2O(l)

Sugars and acids from candies, soft drinks, and fruit juices play a significant role in tooth decay, and consequently in enamel destruction. The mouth contains a great number and variety of bacteria, and when sucrose, the most common of sugars, coats the surface of the mouth, some intraoral bacteria interact with it and form lactic acid, which decreases the pH in the mouth. The critical pH for tooth enamel is generally accepted to be pH 5.5. When acids are present and the critical pH is reached, the hydroxyapatite crystallites of enamel demineralize, allowing for greater bacterial invasion deeper into the tooth. The most important bacterium involved with tooth decay is Streptococcus mutans, but the number and type of bacteria varies with the progress of tooth destruction.

Furthermore, tooth morphology dictates that the most common site for the initiation of dental caries is in the deep grooves, pits, and fissures of enamel. This is expected because these locations are impossible to reach with a toothbrush and allow for bacteria to reside there. When demineralization of enamel occurs, a dentist can use a sharp instrument, such as a dental explorer, and "feel a stick" at the location of the decay. As enamel continues to become less mineralized and is unable to prevent the encroachment of bacteria, the underlying dentin becomes affected as well. When dentin, which normally supports enamel, is destroyed by a physiologic condition or by decay, enamel is unable to compensate for its brittleness and breaks away from the tooth easily.

The extent to which tooth decay is likely, known as cariogenicity, depends on factors such as how long the sugar remains in the mouth. Contrary to common belief, it is not the amount of sugar ingested but the frequency of sugar ingestion that is the most important factor in the causation of tooth decay. When the pH in the mouth initially decreases from the ingestion of sugars, the enamel is demineralized and left vulnerable for about 30 minutes. Eating a greater quantity of sugar in one sitting does not increase the time of demineralization. Similarly, eating a lesser quantity of sugar in one sitting does not decrease the time of demineralization. Thus, eating a great quantity of sugar at one time in the day is less detrimental than is a very small quantity ingested in many intervals throughout the day. For example, in terms of oral health, it is better to eat a single dessert at dinner time than to snack on a bag of candy throughout the day.

In addition to bacterial invasion, enamel is also susceptible to other destructive forces. Bruxism, also known as clenching of or grinding on teeth, destroys enamel very quickly. The wear rate of enamel, called attrition, is 8 micrometers a year from normal factors. A common misconception is that enamel wears away mostly from chewing, but actually teeth rarely touch during chewing. Furthermore, normal tooth contact is compensated physiologically by the periodontal ligaments (pdl) and the arrangement of dental occlusion. The truly destructive forces are the parafunctional movements, as found in bruxism, which can cause irreversible damage to the enamel.

Other nonbacterial processes of enamel destruction include abrasion (involving foreign elements, such as toothbrushes), erosion (involving chemical processes, such as dissolving by soft drinks or lemon and other juices), and possibly abfraction (involving compressive and tensile forces).

Though enamel is described as tough, it has a similar brittleness to glass, making it, unlike other natural crack-resistant laminate structures such as shell and nacre, vulnerable to fracture. In spite of this it can withstand bite forces as high as 1,000 N many times a day during chewing. This resistance is due in part to the microstructure of enamel which contains enamel tufts that stabilize such fractures at the dentinoenamel junction. The configuration of the tooth also acts to reduce the tensile stresses that cause fractures during biting.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease can also lead to enamel loss, as acid refluxes up the esophagus and into the mouth, occurring most during overnight sleep.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, June 27, 2022

Can Tooth Enamel Grow Back? (How To Prevent Enamel Erosion)


To prevent enamel erosion - you can take the same exact steps that you would to remineralize your teeth. This video talks about the 8 tips to restrengthen your enamel (remineralize your teeth) and prevent enamel erosion!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, June 24, 2022

Development of Enamel Formation


Enamel formation is part of the overall process of tooth development. Under a microscope, different cellular aggregations are identifiable within the tissues of a developing tooth, including structures known as the enamel organ, dental lamina, and dental papilla. The generally recognized stages of tooth development are the bud stage, cap stage, bell stage, and crown, or calcification, stage. Enamel formation is first seen in the crown stage.

Amelogenesis, or enamel formation, occurs after the first establishment of dentin, via cells known as ameloblasts. Human enamel forms at a rate of around 4 μm per day, beginning at the future location of cusps, around the third or fourth month of pregnancy. As in all human processes, the creation of enamel is complex, but can generally be divided into two stages. The first stage, called the secretory stage, involves proteins and an organic matrix forming a partially mineralized enamel. The second stage, called the maturation stage, completes enamel mineralization.

In the secretory stage, ameloblasts are polarized columnar cells. In the rough endoplasmic reticulum of these cells, enamel proteins are released into the surrounding area and contribute to what is known as the enamel matrix, which is then partially mineralized by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase. When this first layer is formed, the ameloblasts move away from the dentin, allowing for the development of Tomes' processes at the apical pole of the cell. Enamel formation continues around the adjoining ameloblasts, resulting in a walled area, or pit, that houses a Tomes' process, and also around the end of each Tomes' process, resulting in a deposition of enamel matrix inside of each pit. The matrix within the pit will eventually become an enamel rod, and the walls will eventually become interrod enamel. The only distinguishing factor between the two is the orientation of the calcium phosphate crystallites.

In the maturation stage, the ameloblasts transport substances used in the formation of enamel. Histologically, the most notable aspect of this phase is that these cells become striated, or have a ruffled border. These signs demonstrate that the ameloblasts have changed their function from production, as in the secretory stage, to transportation. Proteins used for the final mineralization process compose most of the transported material. The noteworthy proteins involved are amelogenins, ameloblastins, enamelins, and tuftelins. How these proteins are secreted into the enamel structure is still unknown; other proteins, such as the Wnt signaling components BCL9 and Pygopus, have been implicated in this process. During this process, amelogenins and ameloblastins are removed after use, leaving enamelins and tuftelin in the enamel. By the end of this stage, the enamel has completed its mineralization.

At some point before the tooth erupts into the mouth, but after the maturation stage, the ameloblasts are broken down. Consequently, enamel, unlike many other tissues of the body, has no way to regenerate itself. After destruction of enamel from decay or injury, neither the body nor a dentist can restore the enamel tissue. Enamel can be affected further by non-pathologic processes.

Enamel is covered by various structures in relation to the development of tooth:
  • Nasmyth membrane or enamel cuticle, structure of embryological origin is composed of keratin which gives rise to the enamel organ.
  • Acquired pellicle, structure acquired after tooth eruption is composed of food debris, calculus, dental plaque (organic film).

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com


Tuesday, June 21, 2022

What is Tooth Enamel?

Tooth enamel is one of the four major tissues that make up the tooth in humans and many other animals, including some species of fish. It makes up the normally visible part of the tooth, covering the crown. The other major tissues are dentin, cementum, and dental pulp. It is a very hard, white to off-white, highly mineralised substance that acts as a barrier to protect the tooth but can become susceptible to degradation, especially by acids from food and drink. Calcium hardens the tooth enamel. In rare circumstances enamel fails to form, leaving the underlying dentin exposed on the surface.

Enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and contains the highest percentage of minerals (at 96%), with water and organic material composing the rest. The primary mineral is hydroxyapatite, which is a crystalline calcium phosphate. Enamel is formed on the tooth while the tooth develops within the jaw bone before it erupts into the mouth. Once fully formed, enamel does not contain blood vessels or nerves, and is not made of cells. Remineralisation of teeth can repair damage to the tooth to a certain degree but damage beyond that cannot be repaired by the body. The maintenance and repair of human tooth enamel is one of the primary concerns of dentistry.

In humans, enamel varies in thickness over the surface of the tooth, often thickest at the cusp, up to 2.5 mm, and thinnest at its border with the cementum at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ).

The normal color of enamel varies from light yellow to grayish (bluish) white. At the edges of teeth where there is no dentin underlying the enamel, the color sometimes has a slightly blue or translucent off-white tone, easily observable on the upper incisors. Since enamel is semitranslucent, the color of dentin and any material underneath the enamel strongly affects the appearance of a tooth. The enamel on primary teeth has a more opaque crystalline form and thus appears whiter than on permanent teeth.

The large amount of mineral in enamel accounts not only for its strength but also for its brittleness. Tooth enamel ranks 5 on Mohs hardness scale (between steel and titanium) and has a Young's modulus of 83 GPa. Dentin, less mineralized and less brittle, 3–4 in hardness, compensates for enamel and is necessary as a support. On radiographs, the differences in the mineralization of different portions of the tooth and surrounding periodontium can be noted; enamel appears lighter than dentin or pulp since it is denser than both and more radiopaque.

Enamel does not contain collagen, as found in other hard tissues such as dentin and bone, but it does contain two unique classes of proteins: amelogenins and enamelins. While the role of these proteins is not fully understood, it is believed that they aid in the development of enamel by serving as a framework for minerals to form on, among other functions. Once it is mature, enamel is almost totally without the softer organic matter. Enamel is avascular and has no nerve supply within it and is not renewed, however, it is not a static tissue as it can undergo mineralization changes.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com


Saturday, June 18, 2022

Tooth Decay (Cavity) Explained | Cavities vs Fillings vs Dental Caries


What is tooth decay?  What is a cavity?  Is dental caries a thing?  Where do dental fillings come in?  Let's talk!
Cavities in teeth are caused by the acid byproducts of plaque biofilm and the foods/drinks that we consume. Thankfully, they’re preventable with good daily dental care and regular checkups. The symptoms of cavities include things like sensitivity, pain, rough edges, and discoloration.

Fillings are the best treatment for cavities, but sometimes a crown or root canal is necessary, especially if complications like abscesses develop. If you catch cavities in the earliest stages, you can prevent the bacteria from eroding totally through your enamel. See your dentist at least every six months to help reduce your risk of tooth decay and intercept it when it’s small.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, June 15, 2022


Four things are required for caries to form: a tooth surface (enamel or dentin), caries-causing bacteria, fermentable carbohydrates (such as sucrose), and time. This involves adherence of food to the teeth and acid creation by the bacteria that makes up the dental plaque. However, these four criteria are not always enough to cause the disease and a sheltered environment promoting development of a cariogenic biofilm is required. The caries disease process does not have an inevitable outcome, and different individuals will be susceptible to different degrees depending on the shape of their teeth, oral hygiene habits, and the buffering capacity of their saliva. Dental caries can occur on any surface of a tooth that is exposed to the oral cavity, but not the structures that are retained within the bone.

Tooth decay is caused by biofilm (dental plaque) lying on the teeth and maturing to become cariogenic (causing decay). Certain bacteria in the biofilm produce acid in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose.

Caries occur more often in people from the lower end of the socio-economic scale than people from the upper end of the socio-economic scale.

Read more, here.
707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, June 12, 2022

Signs and Symptoms of Tooth Decay


A person experiencing caries may not be aware of the disease. The earliest sign of a new carious lesion is the appearance of a chalky white spot on the surface of the tooth, indicating an area of demineralization of enamel. This is referred to as a white spot lesion, an incipient carious lesion or a "micro-cavity". As the lesion continues to demineralize, it can turn brown but will eventually turn into a cavitation ("cavity"). Before the cavity forms, the process is reversible, but once a cavity forms, the lost tooth structure cannot be regenerated. A lesion that appears dark brown and shiny suggests dental caries were once present but the demineralization process has stopped, leaving a stain. Active decay is lighter in color and dull in appearance.

As the enamel and dentin are destroyed, the cavity becomes more noticeable. The affected areas of the tooth change color and become soft to the touch. Once the decay passes through the enamel, the dentinal tubules, which have passages to the nerve of the tooth, become exposed, resulting in pain that can be transient, temporarily worsening with exposure to heat, cold, or sweet foods and drinks. A tooth weakened by extensive internal decay can sometimes suddenly fracture under normal chewing forces. When the decay has progressed enough to allow the bacteria to overwhelm the pulp tissue in the center of the tooth, a toothache can result and the pain will become more constant. Death of the pulp tissue and infection are common consequences. The tooth will no longer be sensitive to hot or cold but can be very tender to pressure.

Dental caries can also cause bad breath and foul tastes. In highly progressed cases, an infection can spread from the tooth to the surrounding soft tissues. Complications such as cavernous sinus thrombosis and Ludwig angina can be life-threatening.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, June 9, 2022

Toothpaste Hacks (1 Bad Hack & 5 Good Hacks)


Let's talk about different "toothpaste beauty hacks" and whether or not they are worth your while!  (PS - toothpaste on pimples is a big NO!)

Putting toothpaste on pimples won’t help as much as you may hope it does. In reality, it could just irritate your face and make things worse. The better option is to promote healthy skin with a good oral hygiene and face care routine to limit the bacteria and oils responsible for causing breakouts. But there are still plenty of other useful lifehacks you can get out of using toothpaste around your house. Just try not to use it on your face!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, June 6, 2022

Tooth Decay


Tooth decay, also known as cavities or caries, is the breakdown of teeth due to acids produced by bacteria. The cavities may be a number of different colors from yellow to black. Symptoms may include pain and difficulty with eating. Complications may include inflammation of the tissue around the tooth, tooth loss and infection or abscess formation.

The cause of cavities is acid from bacteria dissolving the hard tissues of the teeth (enamel, dentin and cementum). The acid is produced by the bacteria when they break down food debris or sugar on the tooth surface. Simple sugars in food are these bacteria's primary energy source and thus a diet high in simple sugar is a risk factor. If mineral breakdown is greater than build up from sources such as saliva, caries results. Risk factors include conditions that result in less saliva such as: diabetes mellitus, Sjögren syndrome and some medications. Medications that decrease saliva production include antihistamines and antidepressants. Dental caries are also associated with poverty, poor cleaning of the mouth, and receding gums resulting in exposure of the roots of the teeth.

Prevention of dental caries includes regular cleaning of the teeth, a diet low in sugar, and small amounts of fluoride. Brushing one's teeth twice per day and flossing between the teeth once a day is recommended. Fluoride may be acquired from water, salt or toothpaste among other sources. Treating a mother's dental caries may decrease the risk in her children by decreasing the number of certain bacteria she may spread to them. Screening can result in earlier detection. Depending on the extent of destruction, various treatments can be used to restore the tooth to proper function or the tooth may be removed. There is no known method to grow back large amounts of tooth. The availability of treatment is often poor in the developing world. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen may be taken for pain.

Worldwide, approximately 3.6 billion people (48% of the population) have dental caries in their permanent teeth as of 2016. The World Health Organization estimates that nearly all adults have dental caries at some point in time. In baby teeth it affects about 620 million people or 9% of the population. They have become more common in both children and adults in recent years. The disease is most common in the developed world due to greater simple sugar consumption and less common in the developing world. Caries is Latin for "rottenness".

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, June 3, 2022

Dental Radiography


Dental radiographs are commonly called X-rays. Dentists use radiographs for many reasons: to find hidden dental structures, malignant or benign masses, bone loss, and cavities.

A radiographic image is formed by a controlled burst of X-ray radiation which penetrates oral structures at different levels, depending on varying anatomical densities, before striking the film or sensor. Teeth appear lighter because less radiation penetrates them to reach the film. Dental caries, infections and other changes in the bone density, and the periodontal ligament, appear darker because X-rays readily penetrate these less dense structures. Dental restorations (fillings, crowns) may appear lighter or darker, depending on the density of the material.

The dosage of X-ray radiation received by a dental patient is typically small (around 0.150 mSv for a full mouth series[1]), equivalent to a few days' worth of background environmental radiation exposure, or similar to the dose received during a cross-country airplane flight (concentrated into one short burst aimed at a small area). Incidental exposure is further reduced by the use of a lead shield, lead apron, sometimes with a lead thyroid collar. Technician exposure is reduced by stepping out of the room, or behind adequate shielding material, when the X-ray source is activated.

Once photographic film has been exposed to X-ray radiation, it needs to be developed, traditionally using a process where the film is exposed to a series of chemicals in a dark room, as the films are sensitive to normal light. This can be a time-consuming process, and incorrect exposures or mistakes in the development process can necessitate retakes, exposing the patient to additional radiation. Digital X-rays, which replace the film with an electronic sensor, address some of these issues, and are becoming widely used in dentistry as the technology evolves. They may require less radiation and are processed much more quickly than conventional radiographic films, often instantly viewable on a computer. However digital sensors are extremely costly and have historically had poor resolution, though this is much improved in modern sensors.

It is possible for both tooth decay and periodontal disease to be missed during a clinical exam, and radiographic evaluation of the dental and periodontal tissues is a critical segment of the comprehensive oral examination. The photographic montage at right depicts a situation in which extensive decay had been overlooked by a number of dentists prior to radiographic evaluation.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com



Tuesday, May 31, 2022

If Dogs Don’t BRUSH Their TEETH... Why Should Humans?


Let's talk about the importance of brushing teeth for a healthy life AS WELL AS the importance of brushing your dog's teeth too!  Why don't animals have to brush their teeth?  Just because some people don't brush their dogs teeth --- doesn't mean they shouldn't!

 Veterinarians report that 85% of dogs over the age of 4 are suffering from some kind of periodontal gum disease. The good news for dogs is they are not as prone to cavities as humans are but despite the old conventional wisdom, a dog's mouth is cleaner than a human's mouth. Dogs can still develop problems like tartar and plaque which is leading to gingivitis periodontal gum disease. Even better news for dogs is that we can prevent these gum disease issues by following two steps: step one, taking your dog to your veterinarian for an exam to evaluate if they need a teeth cleaning once a year, and step 2, daily at-home dental care. 

The American Dental Association recommends you brush your teeth for at least two minutes, twice a day, with a soft-bristled toothbrush. Every time you brush, make sure to brush the inner, outer, and chewing surfaces of your teeth. Follow proper brushing technique and the 2/2 rule for a happy and healthy smile! (2 minutes, 2 times per day)

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, May 28, 2022

Mammals and Teeth

Teeth are among the most distinctive (and long-lasting) features of mammal species. Paleontologists use teeth to identify fossil species and determine their relationships. The shape of the animal's teeth are related to its diet. For example, plant matter is hard to digest, so herbivores have many molars for chewing and grinding. Carnivores, on the other hand, have canine teeth to kill prey and to tear meat.

Mammals, in general, are diphyodont, meaning that they develop two sets of teeth. In humans, the first set (the "baby," "milk," "primary" or "deciduous" set) normally starts to appear at about six months of age, although some babies are born with one or more visible teeth, known as neonatal teeth. Normal tooth eruption at about six months is known as teething and can be painful. Kangaroos, elephants, and manatees are unusual among mammals because they are polyphyodonts.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

Origin of Teeth

Teeth are assumed to have evolved either from ectoderm denticles (scales, much like those on the skin of sharks) that folded and integrated into the mouth (called the "outside–in" theory), or from endoderm pharyngeal teeth (primarily formed in the pharynx of jawless vertebrates) (the "inside–out" theory). In addition, there is another theory stating that neural crest gene regulatory network, and neural crest-derived ectomesenchyme are the key to generate teeth (with any epithelium, either ectoderm or endoderm).

The genes governing tooth development in mammals are homologous to those involved in the development of fish scales. Study of a tooth plate of a fossil of the extinct fish Romundina stellina showed that the teeth and scales were made of the same tissues, also found in mammal teeth, lending support to the theory that teeth evolved as a modification of scales.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, May 22, 2022

A Day In The Life Of A Dentist


A day in the life of a dentist video.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, May 19, 2022

What Really is a Tooth?

A tooth (plural teeth) is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and used to break down food. Some animals, particularly carnivores and omnivores, also use teeth to help with capturing or wounding prey, tearing food, for defensive purposes, to intimidate other animals often including their own, or to carry prey or their young. The roots of teeth are covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of multiple tissues of varying density and hardness that originate from the embryonic germ layer, the ectoderm.

The general structure of teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although there is considerable variation in their form and position. The teeth of mammals have deep roots, and this pattern is also found in some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, however, the teeth are attached to the outer surface of the bone, while in lizards they are attached to the inner surface of the jaw by one side. In cartilaginous fish, such as sharks, the teeth are attached by tough ligaments to the hoops of cartilage that form the jaw.

Some animals develop only one set of teeth (monophyodonts) while others are diphyodonts, i.e. they have an early set of deciduous teeth and a later set of permanent or "adult" teeth. Still others develop many sets (polyphyodonts). Sharks, for example, grow a new set of teeth every two weeks to replace worn teeth. Most extant mammals including humans are diphyodonts, but there are exceptions including elephants, kangaroos, and manatees, all of which are polyphyodonts.

Rodent incisors grow and wear away continually through gnawing, which helps maintain relatively constant length. The industry of the beaver is due in part to this qualification. Many rodents such as voles and guinea pigs, but not mice, as well as leporidae like rabbits, have continuously growing molars in addition to incisors. Also, tusks (in tusked mammals) grow almost throughout life.

Teeth are not always attached to the jaw, as they are in mammals. In many reptiles and fish, teeth are attached to the palate or to the floor of the mouth, forming additional rows inside those on the jaws proper. Some teleosts even have teeth in the pharynx. While not true teeth in the usual sense, the dermal denticles of sharks are almost identical in structure and are likely to have the same evolutionary origin. Indeed, teeth appear to have first evolved in sharks, and are not found in the more primitive jawless fish – while lampreys do have tooth-like structures on the tongue, these are in fact, composed of keratin, not of dentine or enamel, and bear no relationship to true teeth. Though "modern" teeth-like structures with dentine and enamel have been found in late conodonts, they are now supposed to have evolved independently of later vertebrates' teeth.

Living amphibians typically have small teeth, or none at all, since they commonly feed only on soft foods. In reptiles, teeth are generally simple and conical in shape, although there is some variation between species, most notably the venom-injecting fangs of snakes. The pattern of incisors, canines, premolars and molars is found only in mammals, and to varying extents, in their evolutionary ancestors. The numbers of these types of teeth vary greatly between species; zoologists use a standardised dental formula to describe the precise pattern in any given group.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, May 16, 2022

Hours of Operation



Mon-Thur 8:00am-4:00pm
CLOSED Friday, Saturday & Sunday

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, May 13, 2022

How To Treat Gum Disease


Gum disease – aka “periodontal disease” aka “periodontitis”– is the most common reason behind adult tooth loss. The number one reason people lose their teeth is not because of cavities - its because of gum disease. Let's talk about how to treat gum disease!

Gum disease is preventable, but only if you catch it in the earliest stage of gingivitis. Once more aggressive periodontal disease kicks in, you’ll require professional treatment to prevent tooth loss.

The severity of your gum disease can put your health at risk. As medical issues and periodontitis go hand in hand, it’s crucial to treat them together instead of as two separate issues.

Treating gum disease starts at home with good daily brushing and flossing, followed up with professional cleanings with your hygienist. 

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, May 10, 2022

Periodontal Disease or Gum Disease .. What is it?


Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is a set of inflammatory conditions affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth. In its early stage, called gingivitis, the gums become swollen and red and may bleed. It is considered the main cause of tooth loss for adults worldwide. In its more serious form, called periodontitis, the gums can pull away from the tooth, bone can be lost, and the teeth may loosen or fall out. Bad breath may also occur.

Periodontal disease is generally due to bacteria in the mouth infecting the tissue around the teeth. Factors that increase the risk of disease include smoking, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, family history, and certain medications. Diagnosis is by inspecting the gum tissue around the teeth both visually and with a probe and X-rays looking for bone loss around the teeth.

Treatment involves good oral hygiene and regular professional teeth cleaning. Recommended oral hygiene include daily brushing and flossing. In certain cases antibiotics or dental surgery may be recommended. Globally 538 million people were estimated to be affected in 2015 and has been known to affect 10-15% of the population generally. In the United States nearly half of those over the age of 30 are affected to some degree, and about 70% of those over 65 have the condition. Males are affected more often than females.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, May 7, 2022

Payment

We will work with you financially to make great dental health and beautiful smiles a reality. We offer CareCredit! CareCredit is a convenient, low minimum monthly payment program for your entire family designed to pay for dental treatment not covered by insurance.

All financial arrangements must be pre-approved with our financial coordinators. 

Call us today to get started!

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

Are You Brushing Your Teeth Too Hard?


Let's talk about the reasons WHY brushing harder is not better!

Scrubbing your teeth hard is NOT good for them. When it comes down to how to properly brush your teeth, you should only be using just enough pressure to gently massage the gums. Nothing more. 

If you scrub hard or use a medium to hard bristle toothbrush, you can actually cause gum recession or wear the tooth enamel away (something we call cervical abrasion.) 

Both of those conditions can pose some pretty significant challenges to your smile, so just resist the temptation to scrub. If you’re having a hard time breaking the habit, try taking a finger or two off of your toothbrush when you’re holding it.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Sunday, May 1, 2022

History of Dental Floss


Levi Spear Parmly, a dentist from New Orleans, is credited with inventing the first form of dental floss. In 1819, he recommended running a waxen silk thread "through the interstices of the teeth, between their necks and the arches of the gum, to dislodge that irritating matter which no brush can remove and which is the real source of disease." He considered this the most important part of oral care. Floss was not commercially available until 1882, when the Codman and Shurtleft company started producing unwaxed silk floss. In 1898, the Johnson & Johnson Corporation received the first patent for dental floss that was made from the same silk material used by doctors for silk stitches.

One of the earliest depictions of the use of dental floss in literary fiction is found in James Joyce's famous novel Ulysses (serialized 1918–1920), but the adoption of floss was low before World War II. During the war, nylon floss was developed by physician Charles C. Bass. Nylon floss was found to be better than silk because of its greater abrasion resistance and ability to be produced in great lengths and at various sizes.

Floss became part of American and Canadian daily personal care routines in the 1970s.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Thursday, April 28, 2022

Insurance

We accept a wide variety of dental insurance. Here is a list of the dental insurances that Dr. Burton is in-network with:

• Delta Dental of CA Premier

• Cigna PPO

• Metlife PPO

• Dental Benefits Providers

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Monday, April 25, 2022

Dental Hygienist TEACHES How To Floss


Let's floss some teeth!  I'm a dental hygienist and I wasn't flossing correctly until I learned how to PROPERLY floss in dental hygiene school - so I'd like to share my technique with you all :) 

When you're not cleaning between your teeth, you are missing 40% of the tooth surface!  

1) Hold It Correctly
Start by getting a long piece of floss and wrap it around your middle fingers.  The longer the floss, the easier it is to wrap it. Next, make sure you’re holding the string correctly.  Wrap it around your middle fingers and try to leave about 2 inches in between your wrapped-in-floss-middle fingers.  Once your string is wrapped around your middle fingers, what you want to use to direct the floss is both your thumb and index finger.

2) Do The Correct Motions
You should bring the floss down between two teeth and make sure you’re touching under the contact area. You actually want to be touching your gums, but make sure you’re not popping it straight down into your papilla (the tip of the triangle of gums in between each tooth).  
Be sure to hug each tooth and go up and down touching it on each side of the tooth, making sure the floss is going beneath the gumline! The dental floss should actually disappear in the space between the gums and the tooth (the sides of the papilla).

3) Understand The Goal
The goal of flossing isn’t to remove food from between your teeth, (although it’s an additional wonderful benefit) but the ultimate goal of flossing is to remove the biofilm pellicle (the stuff that is forming plaque)!  Think about it like you are SCRAPING bacteria off your tooth, not just popping off food that may be stuck. When you are doing this - don’t be lazy about it.  Laziness is when you’re not hugging the tooth.  Remember you need to actually scrape off the biofilm from the tooth itself… think about it as “hugging each side of each tooth” is the best way.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Friday, April 22, 2022

Dental Floss

Dental floss is a cord of thin filaments used in interdental cleaning to remove food and dental plaque from between teeth or places a toothbrush has difficulty reaching or is unable to reach. Its regular use as part of oral cleaning is designed to maintain oral health.

Use of floss is recommended to prevent gingivitis and the build-up of plaque. The American Dental Association claims that up to 80% of plaque can be removed by flossing, and it may confer a particular benefit in individuals with orthodontic devices.[3] However, empirical scientific evidence demonstrating the clinical benefit of flossing as an adjunct to routine tooth brushing alone remains limited.

A Japanese macaque and long-tailed macaques have been observed in the wild and in captivity flossing with human hair and feathers.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Referral Program

We have a referral program…ask us how you can benefit.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Saturday, April 16, 2022

Happy Easter from Us

Happy Easter from us here at Regency Dental.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

A toothbrush is an oral hygiene tool used to clean the teeth, gums, and tongue. It consists of a head of tightly clustered bristles, atop of which toothpaste can be applied, mounted on a handle which facilitates the cleaning of hard-to-reach areas of the mouth. They should be used in conjunction with something to clean between the teeth where the bristles of the toothbrush cannot reach - for example floss, tape or interdental brushes.

They are available with different bristle textures, sizes, and forms. Most dentists recommend using a soft toothbrush since hard-bristled toothbrushes can damage tooth enamel and irritate the gums.

Because many common and effective ingredients in toothpaste are harmful if swallowed in large doses and instead should be spat out, the act of brushing teeth is most often done at a sink within the kitchen or bathroom, where the brush may be rinsed off afterwards to remove any debris remaining and then dried to reduce conditions ideal for germ growth (and, if it is a wooden toothbrush, mold as well).

Some toothbrushes have plant based handles, often bamboo. However, numerous others are made of cheap plastic; such brushes constitute a significant source of pollution. Over 1 billion toothbrushes are disposed of into landfills annually in the United States alone. Bristles are commonly made of nylon (which, while not biodegradable, as plastic is, may still be recycled) or bamboo viscose.

Read more, here.

707-453-1776
1001 Nut Tree Rd, Ste 230
Vacaville, CA 95687
donnathedentist@gmail.com