Sunday, August 2, 2020

The Best Way to Whiten Teeth


Do teeth-whitening products work? Are whiter teeth actually healthier? Dr. Ada Cooper explains everything you need to know about teeth whitening.

Thursday, July 30, 2020

Be Sure to Brush Your Teeth in the Morning and Before Bed!


Captain Supertooth reminds you to brush for at least two minutes, at least twice a day even if you aren't leaving your house! And, if you're remote learning this school year, maybe even brush after lunch!

Monday, July 27, 2020

How Braces Work (And Why So Slow)


Who doesn’t want a nice brilliant smile? Getting braces can fix bigger problems that could affect you later in life too, like jaw alignment. In short, what braces do is apply pressure to the teeth to encourage them to move into the correct position inside the mouth.

Each tooth has a name, and charts of the correct position of each tooth are found all over the dentist’s and orthodontist’s office. Most of us have a slight or significant underbite or overbite. This is due to jaw misalignment, and braces will fix that! But how does all that metal in your mouth really work? And why might someone need braces?

Friday, July 24, 2020

Six foods that are turning your teeth yellow


What makes your teeth turn into yellow? These are six types of foods that you should avoid, since they may stain your teeth. These are just six of more offenders out there. Keep your teeth protected.

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Dental Anesthesia - Treatment & Potential Side Effects


When in surgery, some people suffer from dental anesthesia side effects. Learn more about anesthesia, what kind of anesthesia you may receive, and potential side effects.

Saturday, July 18, 2020

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

What to Know for Your Tooth Extraction


Tooth extraction, or exodontia, is a common procedure. Occasionally, complications can occur after tooth extraction. Here's what you need to know.

Sunday, July 12, 2020

Common Oral Health Issues in Older Adults


As long as many of us can remember, daily teeth brushing and flossing and visits to the dentist office every six months were a regular routine, howbeit, one we didn't particularly care for. We were told at a young age that good oral hygiene was the key in healthy teeth and gums. If proper care was done throughout our lives, we'll have more of our teeth remaining when we got older.

Yet, you likely have a grandparent or aging parents who have partial or full dentures. In fact, so many older adults have dentures that the two have subconsciously become synonymous with each other. In certain instances, poor oral hygiene is the root cause of someone losing most, if not all, of their teeth. However, this is not the case for everyone. As we age, our teeth wear out like the rest of our bodies, and are therefore more prone to disease, infections, and complications.

Many of the common oral health issues that occur as we age are exacerbated by other health issues and common medications that older adults take for those health issues. Specifically, these are the common issues of the teeth and gums that can occur:

  • Tooth loss
  • Oral cancer
  • Thrush
  • Cavities (tooth decay)
  • Gum disease
  • Infections of the mouth and sinuses
  • Inability to taste
  • Denture lesions
  • Oral candidiasis
  • Dry mouth
  • Mucosal lesions
  • Receding gums

Dry mouth can cause a variety of oral health issues, namely tooth decay, and gum disease. As we age, our saliva production gradually decreases. Saliva is the body's built-in mouth cleaner and it plays an essential role in keeping the mouth healthy, functioning properly and looking great. When not enough saliva is produced, trapped bacteria, mostly in the form of lodged food particles, have a better environment to thrive and attach onto teeth. The acid produced by this bacteria eats away at the tooth enamel, slowly penetrating deeper into the tooth. If cavities aren't treated, they can lead to tooth death and the tooth will need to be extracted. Untreated decayed teeth can also form an infection in the root of the tooth, which is in the jawbone. The infection can spread into the jawbone tissue, making the jaw weaker.

Heart medication and medication to treat blood pressure and cholesterol and depression have a known side effect of producing dry mouth.

In addition, the strength of seniors' teeth and gums are naturally weakened from many years of use, wear and tear. As we age, for instance, our enamel, the hard, outermost protective covering of the tooth gradually deteriorates, making our teeth more vulnerable to injury, decay, infections, and staining.

The lack of taste, whether it's caused by medication or other underlying health conditions such as kidney disease or chronic liver disease, can lead older adults to unintentionally harm their already compromised oral health. This might include adding excessive salt to flavor food or consuming very hot foods that burn the gums.

It is important for older adults to be vigilant about their oral health care. Regular visits to a dentist can help prevent or help the progression of oral health issues so that patients can keep more of their teeth and have strong gums.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/10002164

Thursday, July 9, 2020

What Is a Wisdom Tooth Extraction?


A wisdom tooth extraction is a surgical procedure to remove one or more of your wisdom teeth. Learn what to expect, before during and after the surgery.

Monday, July 6, 2020

Kid-Tested, Dentist-Approved: 6 Teeth Cleaning Tips from Dentist Parents


As a parent, you may have more in common with your dentist than you think. Many moms and dads—even dentists—struggle to keep their children’s mouths and teeth clean. ADA dentist Dr. Gene Romo is a father of four – ages 13, 10, 8 and 2. “As you can imagine, there can be a wide range of behavior on who wants to brush and who doesn’t in our house,” he says. “I’m not just a dentist, I’m their dad, so making sure they’re establishing good habits early on is important to me.”

To keep your family’s smiles strong, try some of tricks of the trade from dentist moms and dads:

Establish a Fun Family Routine

In Dr. Romo’s house, there’s one rule everyone follows: “You have to brush before bed, and you can’t leave the house in the morning until you brush,” he says. “The most important thing is to make sure your family is brushing for 2 minutes, twice a day.”

Young kids love to imitate their parents, so take the opportunity to lead by example. “One thing I did with all my kids was play a game with them, kind of like monkey-see, monkey-do. We all have our toothbrushes, and they follow what I do,” he says. “When I open my mouth, they open their mouths. When I start brushing my front teeth, they start brushing their front teeth – and so on all the way until it’s time to rinse and spit. It’s just a fun way to teach them how to brush properly, and we get to spend a little time together, too.”

Making brushing a family affair also helps you keep an eye out for healthy habits. “Some kids want to do everything themselves, even toothpaste, so you can watch to make sure they’re not using more than they should – a rice-sized smear for kids 2 and under and a drop the size of a pea for kids 3 and up,” he says. “You can also do a quick final check for any leftover food when brush time is done.”

Try a New Angle

When her daughter was only 6 months old, ADA dentist Dr. Ruchi Sahota asked her husband to hold her while she brushed or brushed when her daughter was laying down. “You can see their teeth from front to back the best at that time,” she says.

If your child is old enough to stand and wants to brush in the bathroom, ADA dentist Dr. Richard Price suggests a different method. “Stand behind your child and have him or her look up at you,” he says. “This causes the mouth to hang open and allows you to help them brush more easily.”

Bigger Kids, Bigger Challenges

Checking up on your child’s daily dental hygiene habits doesn’t end as they get older. It’s more challenging when they get their driver’s license and head off to college, says ADA dentist Dr. Maria Lopez Howell. “The new drivers can drive through any fast food spot for the kinds of food and beverages that they can’t find in a health-minded home,” she says. “The new college student is up late either studying or socializing. They don’t have a nightly routine, so they may be more likely to fall asleep without brushing.”

While your children are still at home, check in on their brushing and talk to them about healthy eating, especially when it comes to sugary drinks or beverages that are acidic. After they leave the nest, encourage good dental habits through care packages with toothbrushes, toothpaste or interdental cleaners like floss with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. And when they’re home on break, make sure they get to the dentist for regular checkups! Or if school break is too hectic– you can find a dentist near campus to make sure they are able to keep up with their regular visits.

Play Detective…

As your children get older, they’re probably taking care of their teeth away from your watchful eye. Dr. Romo asks his older children if they’ve brushed, but if he thinks he needs to check up on them, he will check to see if their toothbrushes are wet. “There have been times that toothbrush was bone dry,” he says. “Then I’ll go back to them and say, ‘OK, it’s time to do it together.’”

If you think your child has caught on and is just running their toothbrush under water, go one step further. “I’ll say, ‘Let me smell your breath so I can smell the toothpaste,’” he says. “It all goes back to establishing that routine and holding your child accountable.”

…And Save the Evidence

It could be as simple as a piece of used floss. It sounds gross, but this tactic has actually helped Dr. Lopez Howell encourage teens to maintain good dental habits throughout high school and college.

To remind them about the importance of flossing, Dr. Lopez Howell will ask her teenage patients to floss their teeth and then have them smell the actual floss. If the floss smells bad, she reminds them that their mouth must smell the same way. “It’s an ‘ah-ha’ moment,” Dr. Lopez Howell explains. “They do not want to have bad breath, especially once they see how removing the smelly plaque might improve their social life!”

Above All, Don’t Give Up

If getting your child to just stand at the sink for two minutes feels like its own accomplishment (much less brush), you’re not alone. “It was so difficult to help my daughter to brush her teeth because she resisted big time,” says ADA dentist Dr. Alice Boghosian. Just remember to keep your cool and remain persistent.

“Eventually, brushing became a pleasure,” Dr. Boghosian says. She advises parents to set a good example by brushing with their children. “Once your child is brushing on their own, they will feel a sense of accomplishment – and you will too!”

Article Source: https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/babies-and-kids/tips-for-parents?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhtopstories&utm_content=parent-tips

Friday, July 3, 2020

Your Teeth Are Strong—But They're Not Invincible


Your teeth can bite with 200 pounds of force, but they’re not strong enough to stop cavities on their own.

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

What Does Fluoride Do?


Fluoride is commonly used in dental care products and also added to public water supplies. Learn more about what fluoride does to improve your oral health.

Saturday, June 27, 2020

How to Ease Your Child’s Fear of the Dentist


It can be hard to get children to cooperate. Often, “Eat your vegetables, Timmy” is followed by a “No!” and stalks of broccoli flying past your head.

The same can be true of visiting the dentist, especially if your child experiences anxiety in the dental office. But good oral habits begin at young age. So, it’s important to get your kids comfortable with their dental provider and regular checkups and cleanings – especially in the COVID era.

Now that dental offices are reopening, it’s a good time to learn a few tips and tricks you can use to help ease your child’s fear.

KISS: Keep It Simple, Silly

Be as honest and open as possible with your child before their appointment, but for the technical stuff it’s better to let the dentist do the explaining.

Dental professionals are trained to describe procedures in simple, non-threatening ways and are e equipped to answer your child’s questions. And if your child does start to get nervous, they’ll know the best ways to tackle fear in the moment.

In fact, there’s a whole slew of dentists who cater exclusively to children and specialize in getting kids acquainted and comfortable with regular dental visits!

Give Them a Heads Up

Children thrive on predictability – from daily schedules to bed times, they like to know what to expect and when.

So, make sure to tell your child in advance that they have a dental appointment. It gives them time to mentally prepare by expressing their fears and asking questions. And gives you ample time to help them through their dental anxiety.

Bribery is a No-Go

When it comes to getting Timmy to eat his broccoli, the promise of ice cream or cookies might do the trick. But when it comes to preparing your child for their dental visit, experts say it’s best to avoid the sugary treats all together.

Dentists emphasize clean, healthy teeth by avoiding sweets that can cause cavities, so offering a lollipop if they behave sends the wrong message. If you promise your little one candy to keep them from crying or fussing, they’ll wonder what there is to fuss or cry about in the first place. And this can generate more fear leading up to the visit.

Some dentists do give out small treats -- like stickers or toys – as a reward for good behavior. It’s best to keep these incentives as reinforcement for good behavior. It leaves your child with a positive impression about the entire visit.

Talk to Them About Good Oral Hygiene

Just like regular checkups at a doctor’s office, cleanings and routine dental visits are key to maintaining good overall health.

Start by telling your child that the dentist helps keep teeth healthy so that he or she may eat well and grow big and strong. As they get older, explain that taking care of your oral health means a bright and beautiful smile for years to come. If you need some help with this, check out our Tooth Fairy Experience. There’s lots of resources that help make oral health fun for youngsters.

Start ‘Em Young

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, children should have their first dental visit no later than his/her first birthday.

Why? Well not only does this get them accustomed to visiting the dentist on a regular basis, but it provides them with what experts call a “dental home.”

This “dental home” will be where you child becomes accustomed to getting all of their needs – from periodic preventative visits to emergencies – taken care of. The more familiar they are with the dentist and the dentist’s office, the less likely they are to experience dental anxiety.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2020/05/How-to-Ease-Your-Childs-Fear-of-the-Dentist

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

What Too Much Flavored Water Does To Your Teeth


If you're a fan of drinking flavored water, you might want to make sure you're drinking it in moderation. It's a common notion that flavored water is healthy, but due to acids in the drink, you could be damaging your tooth enamel beyond repair.

Sunday, June 21, 2020

10 Things You Didn't Know About Teeth


Here are 10 interesting facts about teeth, human and otherwise.

Other than when it’s time to brush or fix them, you may not think much about teeth. Well, they’re actually pretty fascinating.

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Health Hack: Improving Oral Health


In this week's 'Health Hack' Jane Monzures is bringing you some great tips to help you improve the health of your mouth!

Monday, June 15, 2020

Throwback Toothday: End Your Day on a High Note


Taking care to brush your teeth and clean between them at the end of the day sets your smile up for a brighter tomorrow! Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive.

Friday, June 12, 2020

Crest Pro Health Commercial: The Burbling Bouncing Baby


Parenting takes skill. 👶 Better oral care takes Crest. 😁 The number one toothpaste brand in America.

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Common Myths and Facts About Your Tastebuds


Join Colgate to dispel common myths about your taste buds and get the facts! Do you know how many taste buds you really have? Do we really have only 5 tastes? What are they? The tongue map was created over 100 years ago, but people still believe that only certain parts of the tongue can detect taste. Is this true? Get all the details on bitter, sour, salty, sweet and savory (umami), here.

Saturday, June 6, 2020

Congratulations to the Class of 2020!


Boys & Girls Clubs do whatever it takes to build great futures for America’s youth and graduation is an important milestone on that journey. Although graduation looks a lot different this year, it’s not cancelled. Not for the 3.7 million graduating seniors nationwide or for our thousands of graduating Club members. Here’s to the class of 2020!

Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Why Do I Need to Floss?


Dr. Ward demonstrates the importance of flossing. Remember, if you're not flossing, you're only cleaning two-thirds of your teeth.

Sunday, May 31, 2020

There's More to Your Teeth Than Meets the Eye


Your ADA dentist can spot hidden dental problems before they become big issues. Keep your teeth amazing — and schedule a check-up.

Thursday, May 28, 2020

Dead Tooth: Signs and Symptoms


Your teeth are strong —- really strong. In fact, tooth enamel is the hardest substance in your body. But strong as they are, your teeth aren’t superhuman. In fact, teeth can die just like any other living thing. And if you end up with a dead tooth, it is no laughing matter.

Not only can a dead tooth be unsightly and painful, but it puts you at risk for serious infection, abscess, and tooth loss. Because of this, it is important to know the symptoms of a dead tooth and understand when to seek treatment.

What is a Dead Tooth?

It’s strange to think of a tooth as dead. After all, isn’t it just a lump of enamel attached to your jaw? Actually, no. The outer layers of your tooth — the enamel, dentin and cementum — are hard and bone-like. But beneath this armor lies a chamber of soft, sensitive pulp that is very much alive with nerves, connective tissue, and blood vessels.

Like any other part of the body, when your tooth pulp loses its blood supply, it eventually dies. (I’ll get to how this happens in a minute). When the pulp in your tooth dies, your tooth becomes what dentists refer to as a non-vital, or necrotic, tooth. This non-vital tooth is what we commonly call a dead tooth.

Dead Teeth and Infection

Dead pulp isn’t actually the worst part about a dead tooth. According to the American Association of Endodontists, your teeth need their pulp as they grow and develop. However, once a tooth fully matures, it can be retained and function without the pulp because the surrounding tissues continue to nourish the tooth.

But this doesn’t mean you can just leave a dead tooth alone. The inside of your tooth stays healthy in part because living tissues transport white blood cells and other immune cells to the tooth pulp. When a tooth dies, this access is cut off. Without these immune cells, the pulp chamber can become a breeding ground for infection.

It goes without saying that an infection in your mouth is bad. But an infection caused by a dead tooth is particularly troublesome. Because the infection is deep within your tooth, it can spread to the bone and space around a tooth’s root(s). If left untreated, this infection can create a pocket of pus known as an abscess, and may cause significant pain and swelling.

As I said, a dead tooth is no joke. But what exactly causes a tooth to die in the first place?

Causes of a Dead Tooth

The two primary causes of a dead tooth are decay and trauma.

If decay reaches the center of your tooth either through a crack in the tooth or through an untreated cavity it will inflame the pulp. To protect itself, the blood vessels inside the pulp constrict. But eventually, without enough blood supply, the pulp dies.

A tooth can also die if it sustains a trauma such as a sports injury. If your tooth pushes upward into the bone or gets knocked out, the nerves can get pinched, cut off or damaged. If the blood supply at the tip of the tooth’s root is severed, the pulp dies from lack of blood flow in much the same way as it does from untreated decay.

Smell, Color and Other Symptoms of a Dead Tooth

Now that you know the seriousness of a dead tooth, you should understand the signs and symptoms.

Common symptoms of a dead tooth:

  • Discoloration: A dead tooth often looks yellow, grey, or slightly black.
  • Smell: A dead tooth sometimes smells bad or causes a bad taste in your mouth. This is from tooth decay or other infection.
  • Pain: This pain comes from inflammation and infection in the pulp cavity or surrounding bone.
  • Pimple at the gum line: This is a sign of a chronic tooth abscess that has made its way through the bone to the surface of your gums.

Treating a Dead Tooth

A dead tooth is commonly treated with endodontic therapy, commonly termed a root canal. During a root canal, your dentist or endodontist drills a hole in the top of your tooth and cleans the dead material out of the pulp chamber and root(s). The canal(s) in your tooth root(s) are then filled with a rubber-like material to seal against bacteria and future infection.

Depending on the level of damage, the dentist sometimes places a metal or plastic post inside your tooth to keep a filling in place. In many cases a crown may be placed to further protect and restore your tooth.

If your dead tooth can’t be saved, or if for other reasons you and your dentist choose not to do a root canal, your dentist will likely recommend extracting your dead tooth. This empty space can then be replaced with an implant, partial denture, or bridge.

Contact your dentist right away if you sustain an injury to your teeth, or if you suspect your tooth is decayed. Your dentist will assess your teeth and all the structure and tissues in your mouth, and recommend the best course of action to keep your smile healthy and strong.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2020/05/Dead-Tooth-Signs-and-Symptoms

Monday, May 25, 2020

How to Brush Teeth Correctly


Are you brushing your teeth the right way? Brushing your teeth the wrong way and with the wrong kind of toothbrush can mean that you’re not properly cleaning your teeth. Find out the proper way to brush your teeth and tongue for fresh breath, and better oral hygiene.

Friday, May 22, 2020

Crest: Discovering New Smiles


As we move forward, discovering things that make us smile is more important now than ever.

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Preventive Dental Care: Beyond the Basics


You know to brush and floss daily and visit the dentist regularly. Learn what else you can do to keep your teeth and gums looking their best.

Saturday, May 16, 2020

Throwback Day: A Smile is Contagious


Sharing a smile can brighten someone’s day. Make sure yours is strong and healthy. Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive.

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

What Are the Symptoms of Teeth Grinding?


Dr. Christina Friis-Moeller talks about the causes and symptoms of teeth grinding (bruxism).

Sunday, May 10, 2020

How To Brush Your Teeth In Space | Video


ISS commander Chris Hadfield explains how astronauts maintains oral hygiene aboard the International Space Station.

Thursday, May 7, 2020

What If You Stopped Brushing Your Teeth Forever?


What if you never brushed your teeth? Or even stopped for a year? Here's what would happen!

Monday, May 4, 2020

Healthy Oral Habits at Home


Life feels pretty upside-down right now. Many of us are stuck at home, worried about the health of loved ones, and coping with a million uncertainties. Even the dentist’s office is affected. The American Dental Association recently recommended dental offices close to everything except emergencies during the COVID-19 outbreak.

But during this time of stress and global health crisis, it is still important to focus on personal wellbeing, including oral health. Keeping up on positive oral health habits helps us all feel more balanced, gives us a sense of normalcy, and can keep us smiling in times of stress.

Here are four ways to keep your smile healthy at home during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Drink Plenty of Water

Water cooler conversations are on hold for now— unless you count chatting it up with your dog. But staying hydrated is still important, both for the health of your body and the health of your mouth.

In terms of your oral health, water rinses away food particles that sit on your teeth and cause cavities. Staying hydrated promotes saliva flow, which gives your teeth important proteins and minerals – like fluoride. And if your community provides a good balance fluoride water you receive an extra benefit – every time the water runs over your teeth it strengthens your enamel (the outer surface of your teeth).

Having trouble staying hydrated? :

  • Drink one glass of water with every meal and between meals
  • Add frozen fruit in place of ice cubes
  • Use an app to track your water intake

Avoid Emotional Eating

Many people turn to food for comfort during times of stress. But loading up on carbs and sugar puts you at risk for cavities. It also negatively impacts your mood. So before you reach for that pint of ice cream, consider these alternatives:

  • Stick to a routine. Prevent grazing by keeping your normal meal routine.
  • Drink a glass of water. Thirst is often mistaken for hunger. Try water first.
  • Keep healthy snacks on hand. Keep fresh veggies, fruits or nuts on hand to satisfy cravings in a healthy way.
  • Try sugar-free gum. If you absolutely have to chew, make sure your gum is sugarless.

Keep Up with Your Oral Hygiene

When you don’t have to face coworkers each day, it’s tempting to skimp on your brush-and-floss routine. But remote meetings or not, oral hygiene is still important, especially if your regular dental checkup is postponed because of COVID-19. Why not set your phone alarm to remind you to continue flossing each day and brushing twice daily with fluoride toothpaste?

And remember, although routine dental visits are on hold, many dentists are available for emergency care. If you experience unusual or prolonged pain in your mouth or teeth, call your dentist to discuss your options.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2020/04/Healthy-Oral-Habits-at-Home

Friday, May 1, 2020

Oral Health & Asthma


It might surprise you to learn that 1 in 12 Americans has asthma. Along with the well-known risks asthma brings, it may also increase your risks of developing gum disease, oral sores, dry mouth, and cavities. If you suffer from asthma, try these tips to take optimal care of your oral health and help prevent these side effects.

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

What Exactly is a Dental Emergency?


We are all doing our part to help stop the spread of COVID-19. But sometimes, it’s hard to know when to stay home and when to seek care.

The American Dental Association (ADA) asked dentists to close their offices to everything but urgent and emergent care through at least April 30th. So, what exactly is a dental emergency? And if you have one, what should you do?

When to Call Your Dentist

There are some dental issues that just can’t wait. If you think you have a dental emergency, always call your dentist before coming into the office. Your dentist will determine when, and how, you need to be seen.

But in general, these situations are considered emergent:

  • Persistent bleeding: Bleeding heavily from the mouth, or gums that don’t stop bleeding.
  • Painful swelling in mouth or gums: This could be a sign of a serious infection.
  • Pain in teeth or jawbone: Sudden, acute pain or throbbing pain that persists.
  • Toothache with fever: This could be a sign of a serious infection.
  • Broken or knocked out tooth: Call your dentist right away if this happens.
  • Growths or discolored patches on gums or tongue: Most likely, your dentist will want to examine any abnormalities.
  • Braces wires hurting cheeks or gums: Call your dentist or orthodontist to determine if you need your wires snipped or adjusted.

When to Keep an Urgent Dental Appointment

A few types of dental situations shouldn’t be put off, even if they aren’t considered an emergency. The following dental appointments should be kept even during COVID-19 closures, unless your dentist tells you otherwise.

  • After surgery treatments (dressing changes, stitch removals, etc.) 
  • Denture adjustments for people receiving radiation or cancer treatment

When to Wait

Although it is hard to wait, we all must postpone routine dental appointments for now. Your dentist will call you to reschedule the following types of appointments:

  • Routine exams, cleanings, and x-rays
  • Regular visits for braces
  • Removal of teeth that aren’t painful
  • Treatment of cavities that aren’t painful
  • Tooth whitening

Call First and Avoid the Emergency Room

Most importantly, please remember:

  1. Don’t show up at your dentist’s office without calling first.
  2. Avoid the ER unless it’s life threatening. This helps reduce the burden on emergency rooms during this crisis.

Saturday, April 25, 2020

Causes & Treatments for Tooth Nerve Pain


Tooth nerve pain can occur in a variety of ways; sharp, stabbing, or a dull ache are all signs of tooth nerve pain and all of them make eating less than enjoyable. Getting to the cause of the nerve pain quickly will allow for treatment to begin sooner and for a return to normal eating and drinking habits.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Smile! Tips for Proper Tooth Brushing for Kids


Cynthia Johnson, CDA, RDH demonstrates proper tooth brushing techniques for kids, and offers tips for good dental health in children

Sunday, April 19, 2020

The Real Reason Humans Have Those Sharp Front Teeth


We share our sharp canine teeth with lions, hippos, and other mammals. But believe it or not, they have nothing to do with tearing into meat. Instead, our ancestors originally used them to fight for mating rights, and they shrunk over time as we stopped using our teeth as weapons.

Thursday, April 16, 2020

Root Canal Procedure


What is a root canal, and why would you need a root canal procedure? If you’re having a lot of tooth pain and your dentist finds deep decay, you may need to get this in-office procedure.

Monday, April 13, 2020

Gum Disease


Gum disease is an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth. It is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it. Also referred to as periodontal disease, gum disease is caused by plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that is constantly forming on our teeth.

Here are some warning signs that can signal a problem:

  • gums that bleed easily
  • red, swollen, tender gums
  • gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • any change in the fit of partial dentures

Some factors increase the risk of developing gum disease. They are:

  • poor oral hygiene
  • smoking or chewing tobacco
  • genetics
  • crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean
  • pregnancy
  • diabetes
  • medications, including steroids, certain types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives

See your dentist if you suspect you have gum disease because the sooner you treat it the better. The early stage of gum disease is called gingivitis. If you have gingivitis, your gums may become red, swollen and bleed easily. At this stage, the disease is still reversible and can usually be eliminated by a professional cleaning at your dental office, followed by daily brushing and flossing.

Advanced gum disease is called periodontitis. Chronic periodontitis affects 47.2% of adults over 30 in the United States. It can lead to the loss of tissue and bone that support the teeth and it may become more severe over time. If it does, your teeth will feel loose and start moving around in your mouth. This is the most common form of periodontitis in adults but can occur at any age. It usually gets worse slowly, but there can be periods of rapid progression.

Aggressive periodontitis is a highly destructive form of periodontal disease that occurs in patients who are otherwise healthy. Common features include rapid loss of tissue and bone and may occur in some areas of the mouth, or in the entire mouth.

Research between systemic diseases and periodontal diseases is ongoing. While a link is not conclusive, some studies indicate that severe gum disease may be associated with several other health conditions such as diabetes or stroke.

It is possible to have gum disease and have no warning signs. That is one reason why regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are very important. Treatment methods depend upon the type of disease and how far the condition has progressed. Good dental care at home is essential to help keep periodontal disease from becoming more serious or recurring. Remember: You don’t have to lose teeth to gum disease. Brush your teeth twice a day, clean between your teeth daily, eat a balanced diet, and schedule regular dental visits for a lifetime of healthy smiles.

Article Source: https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/g/gum-disease

Friday, April 10, 2020

Your Teeth Can Last Ages—Keep Them Healthy


Your teeth can survive for centuries, but only if you take care of them. Keep your teeth amazing - visit your dentist and schedule a check-up.

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Cracked Tooth: Symptoms and Repair


Inside our teeth is a dense network of nerves and blood vessels known as the pulp. When the pulp is irritated it can make our teeth one of the most sensitive parts of our body. This sensitivity means we may experience pain as a symptom of a cracked tooth.

A cracked tooth can be serious business. Ignoring the symptoms of a cracked tooth can lead to further dental problems down the road, including infection and even tooth loss.

Why Teeth Crack

Just like a chipped tooth, there are several reasons teeth crack. A strong tooth sometimes cracks because of an accident or a blow to the mouth. But more often than not, a tooth is weakened first before it eventually cracks.

As you age, your teeth weaken from the daily forces of chewing, biting, and grinding. In some cases, you might not even realize the exact moment in which your weakened tooth finally cracks.

Different Types of Cracked Teeth

There are actually several distinct types of cracked teeth. The way your dentist addresses your cracked tooth depends on which type of crack you have, its location in your mouth, and its severity.

The five types of cracked teeth are:

  • Craze lines: A shallow, hairline crack in the enamel of a tooth. Craze lines are common in adult teeth and don’t require treatment.
  • Fractured cusp: A crack in, and including, the chewing surface of a back tooth.
  • Cracked tooth: A crack extending from the chewing surface down toward the root. The tooth is still in one piece.
  • Split tooth: A tooth split into two separate parts.
  • Vertical root fracture: A crack in the root of a tooth.

Diagnosing a Cracked Tooth

It can be frustratingly difficult to locate and diagnose a cracked tooth. This is because cracked teeth may not be visible during a dental exam or show up on an x-ray. It also turns out that our brain is bad at locating the exact source of tooth pain within our mouth. Is the pain coming from the top teeth or the bottom teeth? Sometimes the brain just doesn’t know. As a result, cracked teeth can be confused with sinus pain, headaches or earaches.

To pinpoint the location of a cracked tooth, your dentist will have you bite down on a small item like a plastic stick or a wood dowel, one tooth at a time. He or she may also place a light directly on your tooth or use dark-colored dye to highlight fracture lines.

How to Fix a Cracked Tooth

Treating a symptomatic cracked tooth as soon as possible improves the chances of saving the tooth. Even if the crack in your tooth is small, it can expand with the pressure of biting and eating, eventually turning from a cracked tooth to a split tooth. If the crack in your tooth becomes large enough, it could become vulnerable to decay. If untreated, tooth decay can spread to the pulp and cause a larger infection, eventually leading to a dead tooth or even tooth loss.

How your dentist repairs your cracked tooth depends on the location and type of crack. Some don’t need repair, some might require filling the crack or place a crown over the tooth to protect it from further damage.

If a tooth splits, your dentist will need to remove part of the tooth and repair it with bonding, an onlay or a crown. If the split is severe, the tooth will need to be extracted.

Since there is a range of severity for cracked teeth, the best thing to do is call your dentist right away if you feel pain or suspect a cracked tooth. And of course, maintaining your healthy smile with twice annual oral exams can help your dentist diagnose a problematic crack before it becomes unmanageable.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2020/04/Crack-Tooth-Signs-and-Symptoms

Saturday, April 4, 2020

Easiest Way To Get Rid Of Bad Breath, According To A Dentist


The easiest way to get rid of bad breath is to brush your teeth at night and to drink lots of water, according to an American Dentist Association spokesperson. When your mouth is dry, food and bacteria tend to sit in your mouth for a much longer time. This can cause nasty odors.

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Sunday, March 29, 2020

Here's What Happens If You Stopped Brushing Your Teeth


Nearly half of Americans don’t brush their teeth enough. This opens the door for a bacteria invasion, leading to tooth decay and gum disease. Even worse, you might increase your risk for issues like kidney disease and dementia.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Seal Out Tooth Decay


Brushing and flossing are the best ways to help prevent cavities, but it’s not always easy to clean every nook and cranny of your teeth – especially those back teeth you use to chew (called molars). Molars are rough, uneven and a favorite place for leftover food and cavity-causing bacteria to hide.

Still, there’s another safety net to help keep those teeth clean. It’s called a sealant, and it is a thin, protective coating (made from plastic or other dental materials) that adheres to the chewing surface of your back teeth. They’re no substitute for brushing and flossing, but they can keep cavities from forming and may even stop early stages of decay from becoming a full-blown cavity.

In fact, sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars. This is especially important when it comes to your child's dental health. In October 2016, the Centers for Disease Control released a report on the importance of sealants for school-aged children, of which only 43% of children ages 6-11 have. According to the CDC, "school-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants."

You may have many questions about sealants, and we have answers for you below. Read on to learn more about sealing out tooth decay.

How Do Sealants Work?

Think of them as raincoats for your teeth. When the cavity-causing bacteria that live in everyone’s mouth meet leftover food particles, they produce acids that can create holes in teeth. These holes are cavities. After sealant has been applied it keeps those bits of food out and stops bacteria and acid from settling on your teeth—just like a raincoat keeps you clean and dry during a storm.

Who Can Get Sealants?

Children and adults can benefit from sealants, but the earlier you get them, the better. Your first molars appear around age 6, and second molars break through around age 12. Sealing these teeth as soon as they come through can keep them cavity-free from the start, which helps save time and money in the long run. Ask your dentist if sealants are a good option for you and your family.

How Are Sealants Applied?

It’s a quick and painless process. Your dentist will clean and dry your tooth before placing an acidic gel on your teeth. This gel roughs up your tooth surface so a strong bond will form between your tooth and the sealant. After a few seconds, your dentist will rinse off the gel and dry your tooth once again before applying the sealant onto the grooves of your tooth. Your dentist will then use a special blue light to harden the sealant.

Can Sealants Be Placed Over Cavities?

Sealants can be used over areas of early decay to prevent further damage to your tooth. Because some sealants are clear, your dentist can keep an eye on the tooth to make sure the sealant is doing its job.

Are There Any Side Effects?

With the exception of an allergy that may exist, there are no known side effects from sealants.

Is There BPA In Sealants?

Yes, there is a tiny amount of BPA in sealants but not enough to cause you or a loved one any harm. In fact, you get more exposure to BPA by simply touching a receipt, using cosmetics or coming in contact with dust.


How Long Do Sealants Last?

Sealants will often last for several years before they need to be reapplied. During your regular dental visit, your dentist will check the condition of the sealant and can reapply them as needed.

Are Sealants Covered By Dental Plans?

Some plans do cover sealants, so call your dental benefit company to find out what kind of coverage you have.

Article Source: https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sealants?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhtopstories&utm_content=sealants

Monday, March 23, 2020

Regency Dental Group is Open for Emergency Treatments


Regency Dental takes the health of our staff and patients seriously. In accordance to recommendations from both the CDC and government agencies, as well as dental professional associations, we are postponing all elective and non-emergency treatments until further notice. 

We are, however, OPEN FOR EMERGENCY TREATMENTS ONLY
If you are in pain, please call the office at 707-453-1776 and we will work to get you out of pain. 

In this time of unprecedented uncertainty, we hope you will all understand our decision. Stay safe and healthy everyone!

Friday, March 20, 2020

Remedies for Burning Tongue


An oral burn calls for a swift response if you want to ease the pain. Fortunately, there are several burning tongue remedies that can help next time a swig of steaming coffee or bite of pizza hits a nerve.

Saturday, March 14, 2020

The Four Types of Dental Bridges


If you're missing one or more teeth, you're not alone. Fortunately, you have multiple options for replacing these missing teeth, including dental bridges. Here are four types of dental bridges that your dentist may recommend.

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

How Do Braces Actually Work?


Misaligned teeth can put you at risk for tooth decay, gum disease, and even tooth loss. Braces shift teeth by applying pressure, which constricts blood flow to the surrounding tissue that holds those teeth in place. That, in turn, causes special immune cells called osteoclasts to rush in and dissolve part of the jawbone, creating a space for the tooth to slide over and relieve the pressure.

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Functions for Each Part of the Mouth


Your mouth is made up of many parts, with each part playing a vital role in the health and strength of your mouth. Learn more here about the parts of the mouth and their functions.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Why Dental Sealants for Kids


Tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease in the US. In Washington State, nearly 40% of kindergartners and 58% of third graders have cavities. This might sound dire, but it doesn’t have to be: cavities are preventable.

In addition to brushing, flossing, and regular checkups, dental sealants are another important measure for protecting kids’ teeth against decay. But despite their importance, many parents don’t know much about dental sealants — how they work, whether they are safe, and what they do to protect kids’ teeth.

So, what exactly are dental sealants, and why do kids need them?

Why Kids Need Dental Sealants

Early cavity prevention is extremely important. Cavities in baby teeth lead to cavities in permanent teeth, and to a lifetime of oral health problems. Preventing cavities before they start sets kids up for success — which is where dental sealants come in.

Cavities don’t happen overnight — they are more like a slow erosion. The bacteria in our mouths feeds off sugar in foods we eat. This process leaves behind nasty acids, which weaken our enamel little by little. A dental sealant is a protective coating placed on the chewing surfaces of your child’s back teeth, or molars. Sealants fill the deep grooves that are hard for kids to properly clean when brushing.

In this way, dental sealants are like little tooth-sized levies — one more barrier protecting our children’s teeth against the slow erosion caused by bacteria and acids.

When Should Kids Get Dental Sealants?

The ADA recommends dental sealants for kids ages 5 to 14. Ask your dentist about dental sealants for your child as soon as their first permanent molars come in, between the ages of 5 and 7. Another set of dental sealants can be applied when kids get their second set of permanent molars, usually between age 11 and 14.

Dental sealants are also a good preventive measure for any teenager particularly prone to cavities.

Are Sealants Covered by Dental Benefits?

Dental sealants are considered a preventive benefit, just like regular exams and fluoride treatments. Most plans cover preventive services and dental sealants at 100%, so your child gets all their protective sealants at little or no out-of-pocket cost.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2017/04/guide-to-dental-sealants-for-children

Monday, March 2, 2020

The Terrible Things That Happen When You Grind Your Teeth Too Much


Grinding your teeth is a bad habit. But it could be worse than you think. You could be a chronic grinder and not even know it. Here’s what happens when you grind your teeth too much. And how to stop it.

Friday, February 28, 2020

Enamel: The Shield for Your Teeth


Tooth enamel is perhaps the most important aspect of your oral anatomy. Tooth enamel is the hardest and most mineralized substance in the body and serves as a shield on your teeth. However, enamel does not grow back, so it is vital to understand what it is and how to protect it.

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Regency Dental Testimonial Video


Open in the same location for the past 24 years, we are dedicated to quality service in a home away from home atmosphere.

We strive to make each and every visit a pleasurable experience. Extra care is taken to ensure that the highest standards of disinfection and sterilization are adhered to. This gives all of our patients the confidence to know that they are the top priority and their well being is the most important concern.

Our ultimate mission is to assist in making a contribution to overall health by providing the highest quality dental care possible. You will not only be delighted with the quality of clinical care but also by the way in which you are treated as an individual.

We want this to be your happy dental home.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Your Teeth Explained


Watch the video to find out about your teeth, their structures, the different types, what causes gums to bleed or recede and what you can do to help stop it.

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Throwback Toothday: It’s Never Too Late to See Your Dentist


Rip Van Winkle was very late for his dental appointment, but it’s better to be late than never go at all! Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive. #ADA160

Sunday, February 16, 2020

Oral Health & Arthritis Tips


For people living with arthritis, maintaining a regular at-home oral hygiene routine can be a challenge due to mobility limitations. For some, holding a toothbrush or handling dental floss is difficult.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Children’s Oral Health: 3 Tips for Teaching Kids How to Floss


Kids say the darndest things. Everyday topics, like learning how to floss, can turn into a comedy show. Case in point: One night, as my husband flossed his teeth our daughter exclaimed, “Daddy, why are you removing your teeth?”

Lesson learned. Time to teach her how to floss.

Teaching a kid how to use dental floss is probably the last battle you want to take on at the end of a long day, especially when just brushing teeth can be a struggle. But flossing is an extremely important part of children’s oral health. Dental floss cleans 40% of tooth surfaces brushing can’t reach. Between the ages of two and four, when teeth in the mouth start touching, kids can and should be introduced to dental floss.

When it comes to teaching kids about oral health, creativity goes a long way. Here are my three favorite tips for teaching a child how to floss.

Kids Flossing Tip #1: Use Visuals

Dental floss doesn’t automatically make sense to kids. This is why visuals are a great tool for teaching kids how to floss.

To demonstrate the importance of flossing and good oral health, have your child watch as you dig your teeth into some chocolate. Next, floss your teeth to demonstrate how well dental floss removes leftover food particles. Once she is thoroughly intrigued, break out a dental flosser pick (little kids find these easier to handle) and try it out on her teeth.

Kids Flossing Tip #2: Give Rewards

As a parent, you know how well positive reinforcement works on kids. They love when something fun waits for them at the end of a task. Why not use this same idea for your children’s oral health? Create a chart and give your child a gold star each day she flosses. At the end of the week, reward her with a fun activity or a small toy. She’ll consider it a fun game, but you’ll know that, secretly, she is building solid habits and learning how to floss.

Kids Flossing Tip #3: Create Activities

This is one of my favorite oral health activities for kids of all ages! All you need is playdough, a large Duplo block, and some yarn. The block represents the teeth, the playdough represents food and gunk caught between teeth, and the yarn is the floss.

Use the yarn just like dental floss to show your kids how easily it removes food from teeth. This is a great visual, and kids love jamming the dough in the blocks. Plus, not only do you teach your child how to floss, but you’ve found a way to occupy her for a solid ten minutes — win, win.

Need More Help Teaching Your Kids How to Floss?

These tips are a good starting point, but always reach out to your dentist if you hit an impasse when teaching your child how to floss. Your dentist has even more tips and tricks to make dental floss fun for kids.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2018/02/3-tips-for-teaching-a-child-how-to-floss

Monday, February 10, 2020

Why Is Fluoride Good for Teeth?


If our teeth are made mostly of calcium, why do we use fluoride to keep them healthy? Quick Questions explains why, and how we finally figured it out.

Friday, February 7, 2020

What Is Causing Tooth Pain After My Filling?


The first few days after a tooth filling, it is normal to have some pain in the surrounding area. If after a few days, the pain has not subsided, there may be an underlying issue with the tooth or filling. If this is the case, it is important that you schedule a follow-up appointment with your dentist immediately.

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

10 Causes of Bleeding Gums


You noticed a little pink in the sink after brushing your teeth. Or maybe you noticed blood in your mouth after flossing. What caused your bleeding gums? And is it serious? Gums bleed for many reasons. Some reasons, like gum disease, are serious and warrant a call to your dentist sooner rather than later. Other causes for bleeding gums are less serious. In some cases, you can stop bleeding gums with simple changes to your daily brushing and flossing routine.

Besides serious gum disease, here are ten other reasons gums bleed and how to stop bleeding gums before the problem becomes a bigger issue.

Bleeding Gums Reason #1: Gingivitis
Gingivitis is the first stage of gum disease. Symptoms include tender and swollen gums, and in some cases bleeding gums during brushing and floss.

Gingivitis happens when plaque along your gum line isn’t properly removed. This sticky plaque breeds all sorts of nasty bacteria that infect the gums, causing bleeding and sensitivity. At this early stage, gingivitis can be stopped and reversed before it turns to more serious gum disease.

Prevent or stop bleeding gums caused by gingivitis with proper oral care. Brush and floss regularly and stay on top of your routine dental check-ups.

Bleeding Gums Reason #2: Medications
Another possible cause of bleeding gums is blood thinning medication. Blood thinning medications decrease the blood’s ability to clot, leading to easier bleeding, including at the gumline. Every time you visit your dentist, let her know about any new medications. This helps the dentist identify the cause of bleeding gums and other oral problems.

Your dentist might recommend a different oral care routine to help minimize or stop gum bleeding caused by medication.

Bleeding Gums Reason #3: New Flossing Routine
If your gums bleed after flossing, when they’ve never bled before, the flossing itself could be the cause. If you took a few days off from flossing or increased the rate per week at which you floss, you might notice minor gum bleeding. This gum bleeding should stop on its own after a couple of flossing sessions. If your gums bleed frequently, or every time you floss, visit your dentist.

Bleeding Gums Reason #4: New Toothbrush
A new type of toothbrush can also cause gum bleeding. If you switch from soft bristles to hard bristles, bleeding is sometimes your gums’ way of telling you to take it down a notch. Most dentists recommend a soft bristled toothbrush, specifically because it is easier on gums. So, if your gums bleed from a hard-bristled toothbrush, heed the warning. After switching back to soft bristles, bleeding along the gumline should stop within a few brushing sessions.

Bleeding Gums Reason #5: Pregnancy Gingivitis
Yep, it's a thing. Increased hormones during pregnancy cause increased blood flow to your gums, making them extra sensitive to plaque and bacteria. This in turn often leads to tender gums and gum bleeding during brushing. Pregnancy gingivitis, and any associated gum bleeding, usually stops shortly after pregnancy.

Bleeding Gums Reason #6: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits
You might be surprised to learn that even a temporary lapse in otherwise stellar oral hygiene sometimes causes bleeding gums. Research shows healthy gums can become bleeding and diseased gums with just one day off proper oral care. Yikes!

Prevent or stop bleeding gums with daily hygiene habits. Brush for two minutes, twice a day and floss daily to keep plaque at bay and prevent swollen, bleeding gums.

Bleeding Gums Reason #7: Poor Diet
Some ingredients in processed foods irritate gums and cause minor gum bleeding. Opt for healthier alternatives instead. Fruits and veggies, along with calcium, vitamins C and D, and magnesium are critical components of oral health. Make sure you get your daily recommended allowances of these nutrients

Bleeding Gums Reason #8: Stress
Living in a constant state of agitation and anxiety compromises your immune system, making it harder to ward off any number of issues, including bleeding gums and gum disease. Stress also causes inflammation in the blood vessels. This breaks down soft tissues in your mouth, further slowing the healing process for bleeding gums. Try reducing your stress levels whenever possible.

Bleeding Gums Reason #9: Misaligned Bite
If your teeth aren’t properly aligned you may develop “bite disease,” which is yet another possible cause of bleeding gums. If your teeth are misaligned, the wrong type of pressure is applied to the wrong places when you bite down or grind your teeth.

These destructive forces affect your teeth, as well as the supporting tissue and bone. If you apply repeated pressure in one spot, the gums recede and the bone deteriorates, creating a prime spot for gum disease and bleeding gums. Talk to your dentist about solutions for an unbalanced bite.

Bleeding Gums Reason #10: Smoking or Vaping
It’s true. Both smoking and vaping increase your risk for oral health problems, including sensitive, diseased, and bleeding gums. Once gum bleeding starts, dangerous bacteria trapped between the teeth and the gumline can get into the bloodstream, causing further complications.

If you are worried about how smoking or vaping affects your oral health, talk to your dentist or doctor about alternatives or programs to help you quit.

Visit Your Dentist for Persistent or Serious Gum Bleeding
These ten reasons for gum bleeding are meant as a guideline. But as with anything related to your oral health, nothing substitutes regular dental checkups. At routine dental appointments, your dentist checks for signs of gum disease and screens for other oral health issues. He helps identify if your gums are bleeding, the causes for your bleeding gums, and a plan to stop it.

If your gums bleed persistently or if you experience ongoing pain association with bleeding gums, don’t wait for your next checkup. When left untreated, bleeding gums leads to more serious oral health problems, so make an appointment with your dentist now if you are concerned.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2018/08/causes-bleeding-gums

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Throwback Toothday: Captain Cuspid’s Treasure


Learn the secret to the Captain’s strong smile! Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive. #ADA160

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

How to Select the Best Dental Floss for You


Are you a dental floss connoisseur? Didn’t think so. But walk into a drugstore, and you have choices to make. It’s not just waxed or unwaxed anymore. There’s super floss. Dental tape. Electric flossers and water flossers. Green options include natural floss and biodegradable floss.

Don’t fret. Dental hygienists say the best floss is the one you find easiest to use—and therefore habit forming.

But if you are like many new mothers, you want all the information about getting dental x-rays while pregnant and breastfeeding, before making a decision.

Unwaxed floss: Best for tight spaces
Are your teeth set close together? Traditional, unwaxed floss is made of thin nylon strands and fits into tight spaces. Its non-slip grip makes it easy to hold. Some dentists believe that unwaxed floss cleans better by absorbing more plaque and food particles. Unfortunately, unwaxed floss can fray or break. If that becomes a problem, you can switch to the sturdier waxed floss.

Waxed floss: Best for rough edges
For teeth with rough or irregular edges, waxed floss is the ticket. The waxed coating allows floss to slide rather than snag and it strengthens the material, preventing the floss from fraying or breaking in use. Additional benefits: waxed floss comes in flavors including cinnamon and mint, as well as whitening options, welcome incentives to floss. More importantly, you can also find fluoride-coated floss, allowing you to strengthen your enamel as you clean your teeth and gums. Fluoride-coated floss is particularly recommended for people living in rural areas or who drink bottled water regularly.

Dental tape: Best for larger gaps
Do you have larger gaps between your teeth? Try dental tape. It’s wider and flatter than regular floss and is sold in both waxed and unwaxed versions. Because it glides between teeth at their full height, it’s very effective in removing bits of leftover food.

Water flossers: Best for gentle care
If your teeth or gums need gentle care, try a water flosser. This electric wand shoots a thin stream of water between teeth and around the gum line. Water flossers are quite effective, removing food particles and plaque with ease. Of course, they’re more expensive than other dental floss options and they aren’t as portable.

Super floss: Best for braces and bridges
Water flossers are also good for maneuvering around braces, bridges, and implants. You can try super floss, too. Super floss is a pre-threaded flosser that comes in pre-cut segments. It has a stiff end that helps guide it through tight spaces and hard-to-reach areas.

Electric flossers: Best for when you need a helping hand
If you have arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, or for any reason find it difficult to maneuver dental floss by hand, consider trying an electric flosser. Electric flossers use a sturdy fishing line-like nylon that vibrates between the teeth in an oscillating motion. Don’t overdo it, though. Overzealous use of an electric flosser can wear down your gum line.

Natural and biodegradable floss
Some brands make dental floss out of silk, which will biodegrade in a landfill or even your back yard. However, silk floss isn’t as strong as other floss.

PTFE floss: Not recommended
PTFE floss, made of polytetrafluorethylene, slides with ease between crowded teeth and through complicated dental work. However, PTFE contains suspected carcinogens as well as compounds that may disrupt hormone levels and compromise the immune system. Many oral health professionals recommend selecting a non-PTFE floss. Read package labels before you buy.

Talk to your dentist and try different dental floss options until you find the one that works best for you. If you’re not sure, start by looking for products with the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Acceptance. That way, you’ll know it’s safe for your teeth and will get the job done

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2019/how-to-select-the-best-dental-floss

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?


“Bad teeth don’t necessarily run in the family, but bad dental habits do,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

White Spots on Teeth: Causes and Treatment

white spots on teeth

If you’ve ever wondered about those tiny white spots on your teeth, you aren’t alone. White spots on your teeth are a form of acute discoloration known as decalcification. It sounds a bit scary, but it’s actually a common cosmetic dental problem that most people will experience at some point in there life. Here, we’ll explain the common causes and treatment for those pesky little white spots on your teeth and how you can prevent them in the future.

What Causes White Spots on Teeth?
White spots on teeth can happen to anyone. In general, these spots are primarily caused by the process of decalcification. Decalcification, also known as demineralization, is a process where important minerals like calcium and phosphorus are removed from the structure of your teeth because of acids formed by bacteria. During this process, bacteria dissolves tooth enamel and leaves you with unwanted, chalky white spots that can appear permanently on your teeth. The most common cause of white spots on your teeth include:

Bacteria Overgrowth
The presence of too much bacteria in your mouth can contribute to the formation of white spots on your teeth. It’s because bacteria’s favorite place to grow is on our teeth. This is mostly due to the fact that our mouths check all the boxes that bacteria need to thrive - specifically a highly acidic environment that becomes even more acidic each time we eat or drink something.To avoid bacteria overgrowth in your mouth, make sure that you’re brushing and flossing every single day. It only takes 12-24 hours for plaque to start building up enough to support bacteria growth, making brushing and flossing even more important if you want to avoid white spots.

Too Much Fluoride
Exposing your mouth to too much fluoride can cause white spots to develop on your teeth. The technical term for this is fluorosis, and it typically occurs in children during the time when their teeth and tooth enamel are still forming, between the ages of one and eight years old. The end result of fluorosis is enamel hypoplasia, a defect of tooth enamel that only occurs while teeth are still developing. A child affected by enamel hypoplasia may have permanent, discolored teeth with white spots or deep grooves. Common causes of fluorosis include drinking too much fluoridated water, swallowing fluoride toothpaste, and taking certain medications.

Your Diet
Your diet can cause white spots to appear on your teeth. This is especially true if you have a diet low in foods containing calcium. As we learned earlier in this post, calcium is the foundation of teeth. When our teeth are deprived of that calcium, they don’t have the nutrients needed to build strong, healthy tooth enamel. Foods rich in calcium that may help you build tooth enamel include cheese, almonds, and leafy greens. Avoiding super acidic foods can also help reduce the chance you will develop white spots on your teeth, as acid reflux can trigger acid production and breakdown enamel.

Medications
Some medications may cause white spots on your teeth. Specifically, studies show that antibiotics like amoxicillin can impact the way your mouth builds tooth enamel, making it easier for bacteria to eat through tooth enamel. This happens because antibiotics have the potential to interfere with the way your body absorbs nutrients. Children are the most at-risk group when it comes to the impact of medications on tooth enamel.

Smoking While Pregnant
Smoking tobacco during pregnancy can cause white spots to appear on your child’s teeth. This happens because smoking tobacco during pregnancy can accelerate and promote the process of enamel hypoplasia. As discussed above, enamel hypoplasia ultimately thins the protective enamel on children’s teeth, making them vulnerable to infection and discoloration.

High Fevers
High fever can cause white spots on your teeth, although children are the most susceptible. This is because when you have a fever and feel dehydrated, your mouth and teeth usually take a back seat to feeling better. That means during the spell of a fever, acid has an opportunity to take advantage of a dry mouth and cause damage in the form of white spots on teeth. The best way to avoid this is to ensure your kiddo stays hydrated during a fever and to double down on oral care during their battle with whatever may be causing their fever.

Braces
Having braces can cause white spots on your teeth. If you have had braces at any point in your lifetime, you may notice faint white spots or thing white lines around the edges of where the brackets were glued to your teeth. This happens when minerals are stripped from the tooth due to a high amount of acidity present in the mouth. To avoid white spots popping up, it’s crucial to remove all food particles and debris from your braces as often as possible. In general, good oral hygiene can help reduce the chances of you being left with white spots on your teeth once your braces are removed.

How to Get Rid of White Spots on Teeth
Treating white spots on your teeth can only be done with the help of your dentist. Luckily, there is more than one way to get rid of these annoying little spots.

Enamel Microabrasian
An enamel microabrasion treatment can help you get rid of white spots on your teeth. A microabrasion treatment on your teeth is a process that has similar results to teeth whitening, except the treatment is executed mechanically versus chemically. The process typically involves the use of tools including a rubber cup and a rotary mandrel. It sounds scary, but it’s a common process that dentists use to remove these white spots with the least amount of enamel loss.

Teeth Bleaching
Bleaching your teeth, also known as whitening, can help get rid of white spots on your teeth. The teeth whitening process is pretty straightforward. Essentially, your dentist will use one of two bleaches that are safe for your teeth - hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide. The way it works is that these bleaches will break up your white spots into smaller stains, making them less noticeable and your teeth brighter. Teeth whitening is unique because that is more than one way to get it done. For example, you could try over-the-counter teeth whitening strips. You can also try over-the-counter whitening toothpaste and mouthwash. However, the best way to get your teeth bleached and whitened is to talk with your dentist.

Porcelain Veneers
Veneers can help get rid of white spots on your teeth. Dental veneers, also known as porcelain veneers or porcelain laminates, are wafer thin protective coverings for your teeth that can conceal white spots and stains. They work because a dentist will create a customized veneer designed especially for your tooth color and shape. To adhere the veneer, your dentist will bond them using specialized dental tools. In order to get veneers, a person will usually have to go through three different visits to the dentist to first get a consultation, get fitted for dentures, and then another so the veneering process can be applied.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2019/11/white-spots-on-teeth

Monday, January 20, 2020

Health Hack: Improving Oral Health


In this week's 'Health Hack' Jane Monzures is bringing you some great tips to help you improve the health of your mouth!

Friday, January 17, 2020

Regency Dental Promo Video



If you have suffered from bad dental experiences, ask about oral sedation. It can ease your anxiety about dental treatment. We have provided this level of comfort to our patients for years. This is a family practice. We provide a complete solution to all your oral health and cosmetic needs from age 3 and up.

“Our Vacaville dental team specializes in treating people the way they tell us they want to be treated. Dr. Burton and team strive to take away the fear. We want you to obtain the beautiful smile you have always wanted." Pressed for time?

We have the technology to rebuild a broken tooth with an all-ceramic cap in one visit. Ask about our CEREC™

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

How Old is This Old Stuff


Follow the great advice that was given to Jenny Lorenzo! Leave that old toothpaste in the past and switch to Crest.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

How Veneers, Crowns and Dental Implants Help Patients


Dental technology continues to enhance and improve the dental experience for patients, giving them multiple options for common dental issues that were previously unavailable.

This is true for dental patients who have cracked, chipped, worn, rough teeth or have teeth that are missing.

In the past, patients with less than perfect teeth had to live with the embarrassment and discomfort as dental treatments were more expensive and considered unnecessary cosmetic procedures.

Over time with new technology, once-pricey, elaborate procedures have become quick, routine procedures that are no longer for the wealthy.

It is rare to naturally have a perfect smile where all the teeth are white, smooth, proportional and straight. It is the small deviations of a person's smile that makes it their one-of-a-kind smile. Many patients, however, don't see their imperfections this way. Some patients have trouble chewing, and speaking as well as headaches and jaw pain that is a result of their dental imperfections.

It is the crooked, non-proportional, jagged teeth that are most often treated by a dentist in order to ease the patient's pain and discomfort as well as enhance their confidence and self-esteem.

What kind of dental treatments are available for patients with less than desirable teeth?

The most common are veneers, crowns, and dental implants.

What Are Veneers, Crowns and Dental Implants?

You've likely heard of these before and have a vague idea of what they are and what they do. Here is a brief summary of each:

Veneers

Veneers are thin shells of porcelain that are placed to the front of teeth to enhance or correct their shape, size, and texture. Veneers are a quick procedure that can immediately change your smile for the better.

Crowns

Crowns are great options for patients who have moderate tooth decay or teeth that are chipped, cracked or worn-down. These gold, zirconia or porcelain coverings, go over the impacted tooth to prevent further damage and to keep the strength of the tooth intact.

Dental Implants

For patients who are missing a few teeth here and there, smiling can be unpleasant. You may think your smile is forever ruined and the thought of dentures scares you. Dental implants are the best solutions for your case. Implants are for patients who still have most of their natural teeth. Dental implants fill the empty space left behind with a naturally-looking tooth-like crown.

The Benefits of Veneers, Crowns and Dental Implants

Veneers, crowns, and dental implants can do wonders in restoring or enhancing your natural, unique smile. All three teeth procedures can give you your dream smile that you'll be proud to show-off. The confidence in one's smile can also improve your mood and make you more approachable as you'll be laughing and smiling away.

Besides enhancing your smile to its maximum potential, these dental treatments can correct and restore the proper functioning of your bite, allowing you to comfortably bite and chew and speak clearly. Being able to do these basic oral functions, a patient's quality of life can be greatly improved.

With modern dental equipment and technology, patients who have a less than ideal smile because of their tooth imperfections now can easily achieve the smile they've always wanted.

Patients should contact their dentist to discuss which option would best achieve their desired results.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9783237

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Throwback Toothday: Secrets to a Swingin’ Smile


Remind your teens – when you can catch them – to take care of their teeth! Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

ADA Science Inside: How Tooth Whitening Works



Over time, teeth can go from white to not-so-bright for a number of reasons. Find out what foods can stain your teeth, and learn why your teeth darken with age. Then, watch as Dr. Jane Gillette from the American Dental Association explains how bleaching ingredients brighten your smile and walks through the whitening treatments you can try at home or have done in your dentist’s office.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Changing Your Smile With Restorative Dentistry


Healthy teeth are something most people take for granted. It is only when we experience tooth pain or have problems that we realize how nice it is to have healthy teeth. Taking care of our teeth is a principle most adults are taught as kids, but when corners are cut, problems start to happen. This is where restorative dentistry comes in.

What is Restorative Dentistry?

This branch of specialty dentistry focuses on restoring teeth. There are all kinds of problems that happen with the mouth over a lifetime including:

· Gum disease

· Broken teeth

· Missing teeth

· Chipped Teeth

· Stained or discolored teeth

· Displaced Teeth

These are all common problems that happen from accidents, dental trauma, and neglect. Having the right help to get your smile looking great again is something a restorative dentist is trained to do. Rather than only focusing on preventative measures to keeping cavities at bay, they want to help fix your problems to restore your smile to its glory after an accident.

Common Procedures

Restorative dentists have a lot of tools available to fix the problems you see with your smile. Some of these options include:

· Root canals

· Crowns

· Bridges

· Dental Implants

· Tooth-colored Fillings

· Full and partial dentures

After an assessment to see the damage, a dentist can give recommendations on what procedure is best for your situation. For instance, if you have a tooth knocked out in an accident, your only option is not a dental implant. Other factors need consideration like the age of the patient, placement of the tooth, and condition of the mouth. These are all requirements a restorative dentist will know more about and can diagnose more quickly than other professionals.

Making a New Smile

Restorative dentistry is more than just restoring a smile that was damaged. The tools available to a restorative dentist can help improve a smile that is just needing some extra work to make it perfect. Many people are born with a smile that is imperfect and needs correcting with procedures like:

· Straightening and whitening teeth

· Restoring and strengthening teeth and jaw bones

· Repair or replace chipped or broken teeth

· Replace missing or lost teeth

These procedures can make all the difference in the way you look and feel about yourself. Having a smile that you can proudly show will boost your self-confidence. When you feel great, you look great, which is exactly what restorative dentistry tries to do for patients.

Taking the First Step

The first thing you should do is find a restorative dentist and make an appointment. During the first visit, they will give you their opinion on what work is required. They will also give you an estimate on time it will take and how much it will cost. Most are willing to help with payment plans if you can't afford the price tag up front. The focus is on getting your smile to a place where you feel confident showing it and there is no pain in chewing or talking. It's time to stop covering up your smile and get some confidence. Find a restorative dentist in your area today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9803661