Sunday, March 29, 2020

Here's What Happens If You Stopped Brushing Your Teeth


Nearly half of Americans don’t brush their teeth enough. This opens the door for a bacteria invasion, leading to tooth decay and gum disease. Even worse, you might increase your risk for issues like kidney disease and dementia.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Seal Out Tooth Decay


Brushing and flossing are the best ways to help prevent cavities, but it’s not always easy to clean every nook and cranny of your teeth – especially those back teeth you use to chew (called molars). Molars are rough, uneven and a favorite place for leftover food and cavity-causing bacteria to hide.

Still, there’s another safety net to help keep those teeth clean. It’s called a sealant, and it is a thin, protective coating (made from plastic or other dental materials) that adheres to the chewing surface of your back teeth. They’re no substitute for brushing and flossing, but they can keep cavities from forming and may even stop early stages of decay from becoming a full-blown cavity.

In fact, sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars. This is especially important when it comes to your child's dental health. In October 2016, the Centers for Disease Control released a report on the importance of sealants for school-aged children, of which only 43% of children ages 6-11 have. According to the CDC, "school-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants."

You may have many questions about sealants, and we have answers for you below. Read on to learn more about sealing out tooth decay.

How Do Sealants Work?

Think of them as raincoats for your teeth. When the cavity-causing bacteria that live in everyone’s mouth meet leftover food particles, they produce acids that can create holes in teeth. These holes are cavities. After sealant has been applied it keeps those bits of food out and stops bacteria and acid from settling on your teeth—just like a raincoat keeps you clean and dry during a storm.

Who Can Get Sealants?

Children and adults can benefit from sealants, but the earlier you get them, the better. Your first molars appear around age 6, and second molars break through around age 12. Sealing these teeth as soon as they come through can keep them cavity-free from the start, which helps save time and money in the long run. Ask your dentist if sealants are a good option for you and your family.

How Are Sealants Applied?

It’s a quick and painless process. Your dentist will clean and dry your tooth before placing an acidic gel on your teeth. This gel roughs up your tooth surface so a strong bond will form between your tooth and the sealant. After a few seconds, your dentist will rinse off the gel and dry your tooth once again before applying the sealant onto the grooves of your tooth. Your dentist will then use a special blue light to harden the sealant.

Can Sealants Be Placed Over Cavities?

Sealants can be used over areas of early decay to prevent further damage to your tooth. Because some sealants are clear, your dentist can keep an eye on the tooth to make sure the sealant is doing its job.

Are There Any Side Effects?

With the exception of an allergy that may exist, there are no known side effects from sealants.

Is There BPA In Sealants?

Yes, there is a tiny amount of BPA in sealants but not enough to cause you or a loved one any harm. In fact, you get more exposure to BPA by simply touching a receipt, using cosmetics or coming in contact with dust.


How Long Do Sealants Last?

Sealants will often last for several years before they need to be reapplied. During your regular dental visit, your dentist will check the condition of the sealant and can reapply them as needed.

Are Sealants Covered By Dental Plans?

Some plans do cover sealants, so call your dental benefit company to find out what kind of coverage you have.

Article Source: https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sealants?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhtopstories&utm_content=sealants

Monday, March 23, 2020

Regency Dental Group is Open for Emergency Treatments


Regency Dental takes the health of our staff and patients seriously. In accordance to recommendations from both the CDC and government agencies, as well as dental professional associations, we are postponing all elective and non-emergency treatments until further notice. 

We are, however, OPEN FOR EMERGENCY TREATMENTS ONLY
If you are in pain, please call the office at 707-453-1776 and we will work to get you out of pain. 

In this time of unprecedented uncertainty, we hope you will all understand our decision. Stay safe and healthy everyone!

Friday, March 20, 2020

Remedies for Burning Tongue


An oral burn calls for a swift response if you want to ease the pain. Fortunately, there are several burning tongue remedies that can help next time a swig of steaming coffee or bite of pizza hits a nerve.

Saturday, March 14, 2020

The Four Types of Dental Bridges


If you're missing one or more teeth, you're not alone. Fortunately, you have multiple options for replacing these missing teeth, including dental bridges. Here are four types of dental bridges that your dentist may recommend.

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

How Do Braces Actually Work?


Misaligned teeth can put you at risk for tooth decay, gum disease, and even tooth loss. Braces shift teeth by applying pressure, which constricts blood flow to the surrounding tissue that holds those teeth in place. That, in turn, causes special immune cells called osteoclasts to rush in and dissolve part of the jawbone, creating a space for the tooth to slide over and relieve the pressure.

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Functions for Each Part of the Mouth


Your mouth is made up of many parts, with each part playing a vital role in the health and strength of your mouth. Learn more here about the parts of the mouth and their functions.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Why Dental Sealants for Kids


Tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease in the US. In Washington State, nearly 40% of kindergartners and 58% of third graders have cavities. This might sound dire, but it doesn’t have to be: cavities are preventable.

In addition to brushing, flossing, and regular checkups, dental sealants are another important measure for protecting kids’ teeth against decay. But despite their importance, many parents don’t know much about dental sealants — how they work, whether they are safe, and what they do to protect kids’ teeth.

So, what exactly are dental sealants, and why do kids need them?

Why Kids Need Dental Sealants

Early cavity prevention is extremely important. Cavities in baby teeth lead to cavities in permanent teeth, and to a lifetime of oral health problems. Preventing cavities before they start sets kids up for success — which is where dental sealants come in.

Cavities don’t happen overnight — they are more like a slow erosion. The bacteria in our mouths feeds off sugar in foods we eat. This process leaves behind nasty acids, which weaken our enamel little by little. A dental sealant is a protective coating placed on the chewing surfaces of your child’s back teeth, or molars. Sealants fill the deep grooves that are hard for kids to properly clean when brushing.

In this way, dental sealants are like little tooth-sized levies — one more barrier protecting our children’s teeth against the slow erosion caused by bacteria and acids.

When Should Kids Get Dental Sealants?

The ADA recommends dental sealants for kids ages 5 to 14. Ask your dentist about dental sealants for your child as soon as their first permanent molars come in, between the ages of 5 and 7. Another set of dental sealants can be applied when kids get their second set of permanent molars, usually between age 11 and 14.

Dental sealants are also a good preventive measure for any teenager particularly prone to cavities.

Are Sealants Covered by Dental Benefits?

Dental sealants are considered a preventive benefit, just like regular exams and fluoride treatments. Most plans cover preventive services and dental sealants at 100%, so your child gets all their protective sealants at little or no out-of-pocket cost.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2017/04/guide-to-dental-sealants-for-children

Monday, March 2, 2020

The Terrible Things That Happen When You Grind Your Teeth Too Much


Grinding your teeth is a bad habit. But it could be worse than you think. You could be a chronic grinder and not even know it. Here’s what happens when you grind your teeth too much. And how to stop it.

Friday, February 28, 2020

Enamel: The Shield for Your Teeth


Tooth enamel is perhaps the most important aspect of your oral anatomy. Tooth enamel is the hardest and most mineralized substance in the body and serves as a shield on your teeth. However, enamel does not grow back, so it is vital to understand what it is and how to protect it.

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Regency Dental Testimonial Video


Open in the same location for the past 24 years, we are dedicated to quality service in a home away from home atmosphere.

We strive to make each and every visit a pleasurable experience. Extra care is taken to ensure that the highest standards of disinfection and sterilization are adhered to. This gives all of our patients the confidence to know that they are the top priority and their well being is the most important concern.

Our ultimate mission is to assist in making a contribution to overall health by providing the highest quality dental care possible. You will not only be delighted with the quality of clinical care but also by the way in which you are treated as an individual.

We want this to be your happy dental home.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Your Teeth Explained


Watch the video to find out about your teeth, their structures, the different types, what causes gums to bleed or recede and what you can do to help stop it.

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Throwback Toothday: It’s Never Too Late to See Your Dentist


Rip Van Winkle was very late for his dental appointment, but it’s better to be late than never go at all! Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive. #ADA160

Sunday, February 16, 2020

Oral Health & Arthritis Tips


For people living with arthritis, maintaining a regular at-home oral hygiene routine can be a challenge due to mobility limitations. For some, holding a toothbrush or handling dental floss is difficult.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Children’s Oral Health: 3 Tips for Teaching Kids How to Floss


Kids say the darndest things. Everyday topics, like learning how to floss, can turn into a comedy show. Case in point: One night, as my husband flossed his teeth our daughter exclaimed, “Daddy, why are you removing your teeth?”

Lesson learned. Time to teach her how to floss.

Teaching a kid how to use dental floss is probably the last battle you want to take on at the end of a long day, especially when just brushing teeth can be a struggle. But flossing is an extremely important part of children’s oral health. Dental floss cleans 40% of tooth surfaces brushing can’t reach. Between the ages of two and four, when teeth in the mouth start touching, kids can and should be introduced to dental floss.

When it comes to teaching kids about oral health, creativity goes a long way. Here are my three favorite tips for teaching a child how to floss.

Kids Flossing Tip #1: Use Visuals

Dental floss doesn’t automatically make sense to kids. This is why visuals are a great tool for teaching kids how to floss.

To demonstrate the importance of flossing and good oral health, have your child watch as you dig your teeth into some chocolate. Next, floss your teeth to demonstrate how well dental floss removes leftover food particles. Once she is thoroughly intrigued, break out a dental flosser pick (little kids find these easier to handle) and try it out on her teeth.

Kids Flossing Tip #2: Give Rewards

As a parent, you know how well positive reinforcement works on kids. They love when something fun waits for them at the end of a task. Why not use this same idea for your children’s oral health? Create a chart and give your child a gold star each day she flosses. At the end of the week, reward her with a fun activity or a small toy. She’ll consider it a fun game, but you’ll know that, secretly, she is building solid habits and learning how to floss.

Kids Flossing Tip #3: Create Activities

This is one of my favorite oral health activities for kids of all ages! All you need is playdough, a large Duplo block, and some yarn. The block represents the teeth, the playdough represents food and gunk caught between teeth, and the yarn is the floss.

Use the yarn just like dental floss to show your kids how easily it removes food from teeth. This is a great visual, and kids love jamming the dough in the blocks. Plus, not only do you teach your child how to floss, but you’ve found a way to occupy her for a solid ten minutes — win, win.

Need More Help Teaching Your Kids How to Floss?

These tips are a good starting point, but always reach out to your dentist if you hit an impasse when teaching your child how to floss. Your dentist has even more tips and tricks to make dental floss fun for kids.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2018/02/3-tips-for-teaching-a-child-how-to-floss

Monday, February 10, 2020

Why Is Fluoride Good for Teeth?


If our teeth are made mostly of calcium, why do we use fluoride to keep them healthy? Quick Questions explains why, and how we finally figured it out.

Friday, February 7, 2020

What Is Causing Tooth Pain After My Filling?


The first few days after a tooth filling, it is normal to have some pain in the surrounding area. If after a few days, the pain has not subsided, there may be an underlying issue with the tooth or filling. If this is the case, it is important that you schedule a follow-up appointment with your dentist immediately.

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

10 Causes of Bleeding Gums


You noticed a little pink in the sink after brushing your teeth. Or maybe you noticed blood in your mouth after flossing. What caused your bleeding gums? And is it serious? Gums bleed for many reasons. Some reasons, like gum disease, are serious and warrant a call to your dentist sooner rather than later. Other causes for bleeding gums are less serious. In some cases, you can stop bleeding gums with simple changes to your daily brushing and flossing routine.

Besides serious gum disease, here are ten other reasons gums bleed and how to stop bleeding gums before the problem becomes a bigger issue.

Bleeding Gums Reason #1: Gingivitis
Gingivitis is the first stage of gum disease. Symptoms include tender and swollen gums, and in some cases bleeding gums during brushing and floss.

Gingivitis happens when plaque along your gum line isn’t properly removed. This sticky plaque breeds all sorts of nasty bacteria that infect the gums, causing bleeding and sensitivity. At this early stage, gingivitis can be stopped and reversed before it turns to more serious gum disease.

Prevent or stop bleeding gums caused by gingivitis with proper oral care. Brush and floss regularly and stay on top of your routine dental check-ups.

Bleeding Gums Reason #2: Medications
Another possible cause of bleeding gums is blood thinning medication. Blood thinning medications decrease the blood’s ability to clot, leading to easier bleeding, including at the gumline. Every time you visit your dentist, let her know about any new medications. This helps the dentist identify the cause of bleeding gums and other oral problems.

Your dentist might recommend a different oral care routine to help minimize or stop gum bleeding caused by medication.

Bleeding Gums Reason #3: New Flossing Routine
If your gums bleed after flossing, when they’ve never bled before, the flossing itself could be the cause. If you took a few days off from flossing or increased the rate per week at which you floss, you might notice minor gum bleeding. This gum bleeding should stop on its own after a couple of flossing sessions. If your gums bleed frequently, or every time you floss, visit your dentist.

Bleeding Gums Reason #4: New Toothbrush
A new type of toothbrush can also cause gum bleeding. If you switch from soft bristles to hard bristles, bleeding is sometimes your gums’ way of telling you to take it down a notch. Most dentists recommend a soft bristled toothbrush, specifically because it is easier on gums. So, if your gums bleed from a hard-bristled toothbrush, heed the warning. After switching back to soft bristles, bleeding along the gumline should stop within a few brushing sessions.

Bleeding Gums Reason #5: Pregnancy Gingivitis
Yep, it's a thing. Increased hormones during pregnancy cause increased blood flow to your gums, making them extra sensitive to plaque and bacteria. This in turn often leads to tender gums and gum bleeding during brushing. Pregnancy gingivitis, and any associated gum bleeding, usually stops shortly after pregnancy.

Bleeding Gums Reason #6: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits
You might be surprised to learn that even a temporary lapse in otherwise stellar oral hygiene sometimes causes bleeding gums. Research shows healthy gums can become bleeding and diseased gums with just one day off proper oral care. Yikes!

Prevent or stop bleeding gums with daily hygiene habits. Brush for two minutes, twice a day and floss daily to keep plaque at bay and prevent swollen, bleeding gums.

Bleeding Gums Reason #7: Poor Diet
Some ingredients in processed foods irritate gums and cause minor gum bleeding. Opt for healthier alternatives instead. Fruits and veggies, along with calcium, vitamins C and D, and magnesium are critical components of oral health. Make sure you get your daily recommended allowances of these nutrients

Bleeding Gums Reason #8: Stress
Living in a constant state of agitation and anxiety compromises your immune system, making it harder to ward off any number of issues, including bleeding gums and gum disease. Stress also causes inflammation in the blood vessels. This breaks down soft tissues in your mouth, further slowing the healing process for bleeding gums. Try reducing your stress levels whenever possible.

Bleeding Gums Reason #9: Misaligned Bite
If your teeth aren’t properly aligned you may develop “bite disease,” which is yet another possible cause of bleeding gums. If your teeth are misaligned, the wrong type of pressure is applied to the wrong places when you bite down or grind your teeth.

These destructive forces affect your teeth, as well as the supporting tissue and bone. If you apply repeated pressure in one spot, the gums recede and the bone deteriorates, creating a prime spot for gum disease and bleeding gums. Talk to your dentist about solutions for an unbalanced bite.

Bleeding Gums Reason #10: Smoking or Vaping
It’s true. Both smoking and vaping increase your risk for oral health problems, including sensitive, diseased, and bleeding gums. Once gum bleeding starts, dangerous bacteria trapped between the teeth and the gumline can get into the bloodstream, causing further complications.

If you are worried about how smoking or vaping affects your oral health, talk to your dentist or doctor about alternatives or programs to help you quit.

Visit Your Dentist for Persistent or Serious Gum Bleeding
These ten reasons for gum bleeding are meant as a guideline. But as with anything related to your oral health, nothing substitutes regular dental checkups. At routine dental appointments, your dentist checks for signs of gum disease and screens for other oral health issues. He helps identify if your gums are bleeding, the causes for your bleeding gums, and a plan to stop it.

If your gums bleed persistently or if you experience ongoing pain association with bleeding gums, don’t wait for your next checkup. When left untreated, bleeding gums leads to more serious oral health problems, so make an appointment with your dentist now if you are concerned.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2018/08/causes-bleeding-gums

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Throwback Toothday: Captain Cuspid’s Treasure


Learn the secret to the Captain’s strong smile! Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive. #ADA160

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

How to Select the Best Dental Floss for You


Are you a dental floss connoisseur? Didn’t think so. But walk into a drugstore, and you have choices to make. It’s not just waxed or unwaxed anymore. There’s super floss. Dental tape. Electric flossers and water flossers. Green options include natural floss and biodegradable floss.

Don’t fret. Dental hygienists say the best floss is the one you find easiest to use—and therefore habit forming.

But if you are like many new mothers, you want all the information about getting dental x-rays while pregnant and breastfeeding, before making a decision.

Unwaxed floss: Best for tight spaces
Are your teeth set close together? Traditional, unwaxed floss is made of thin nylon strands and fits into tight spaces. Its non-slip grip makes it easy to hold. Some dentists believe that unwaxed floss cleans better by absorbing more plaque and food particles. Unfortunately, unwaxed floss can fray or break. If that becomes a problem, you can switch to the sturdier waxed floss.

Waxed floss: Best for rough edges
For teeth with rough or irregular edges, waxed floss is the ticket. The waxed coating allows floss to slide rather than snag and it strengthens the material, preventing the floss from fraying or breaking in use. Additional benefits: waxed floss comes in flavors including cinnamon and mint, as well as whitening options, welcome incentives to floss. More importantly, you can also find fluoride-coated floss, allowing you to strengthen your enamel as you clean your teeth and gums. Fluoride-coated floss is particularly recommended for people living in rural areas or who drink bottled water regularly.

Dental tape: Best for larger gaps
Do you have larger gaps between your teeth? Try dental tape. It’s wider and flatter than regular floss and is sold in both waxed and unwaxed versions. Because it glides between teeth at their full height, it’s very effective in removing bits of leftover food.

Water flossers: Best for gentle care
If your teeth or gums need gentle care, try a water flosser. This electric wand shoots a thin stream of water between teeth and around the gum line. Water flossers are quite effective, removing food particles and plaque with ease. Of course, they’re more expensive than other dental floss options and they aren’t as portable.

Super floss: Best for braces and bridges
Water flossers are also good for maneuvering around braces, bridges, and implants. You can try super floss, too. Super floss is a pre-threaded flosser that comes in pre-cut segments. It has a stiff end that helps guide it through tight spaces and hard-to-reach areas.

Electric flossers: Best for when you need a helping hand
If you have arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, or for any reason find it difficult to maneuver dental floss by hand, consider trying an electric flosser. Electric flossers use a sturdy fishing line-like nylon that vibrates between the teeth in an oscillating motion. Don’t overdo it, though. Overzealous use of an electric flosser can wear down your gum line.

Natural and biodegradable floss
Some brands make dental floss out of silk, which will biodegrade in a landfill or even your back yard. However, silk floss isn’t as strong as other floss.

PTFE floss: Not recommended
PTFE floss, made of polytetrafluorethylene, slides with ease between crowded teeth and through complicated dental work. However, PTFE contains suspected carcinogens as well as compounds that may disrupt hormone levels and compromise the immune system. Many oral health professionals recommend selecting a non-PTFE floss. Read package labels before you buy.

Talk to your dentist and try different dental floss options until you find the one that works best for you. If you’re not sure, start by looking for products with the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Acceptance. That way, you’ll know it’s safe for your teeth and will get the job done

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2019/how-to-select-the-best-dental-floss

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?


“Bad teeth don’t necessarily run in the family, but bad dental habits do,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

White Spots on Teeth: Causes and Treatment

white spots on teeth

If you’ve ever wondered about those tiny white spots on your teeth, you aren’t alone. White spots on your teeth are a form of acute discoloration known as decalcification. It sounds a bit scary, but it’s actually a common cosmetic dental problem that most people will experience at some point in there life. Here, we’ll explain the common causes and treatment for those pesky little white spots on your teeth and how you can prevent them in the future.

What Causes White Spots on Teeth?
White spots on teeth can happen to anyone. In general, these spots are primarily caused by the process of decalcification. Decalcification, also known as demineralization, is a process where important minerals like calcium and phosphorus are removed from the structure of your teeth because of acids formed by bacteria. During this process, bacteria dissolves tooth enamel and leaves you with unwanted, chalky white spots that can appear permanently on your teeth. The most common cause of white spots on your teeth include:

Bacteria Overgrowth
The presence of too much bacteria in your mouth can contribute to the formation of white spots on your teeth. It’s because bacteria’s favorite place to grow is on our teeth. This is mostly due to the fact that our mouths check all the boxes that bacteria need to thrive - specifically a highly acidic environment that becomes even more acidic each time we eat or drink something.To avoid bacteria overgrowth in your mouth, make sure that you’re brushing and flossing every single day. It only takes 12-24 hours for plaque to start building up enough to support bacteria growth, making brushing and flossing even more important if you want to avoid white spots.

Too Much Fluoride
Exposing your mouth to too much fluoride can cause white spots to develop on your teeth. The technical term for this is fluorosis, and it typically occurs in children during the time when their teeth and tooth enamel are still forming, between the ages of one and eight years old. The end result of fluorosis is enamel hypoplasia, a defect of tooth enamel that only occurs while teeth are still developing. A child affected by enamel hypoplasia may have permanent, discolored teeth with white spots or deep grooves. Common causes of fluorosis include drinking too much fluoridated water, swallowing fluoride toothpaste, and taking certain medications.

Your Diet
Your diet can cause white spots to appear on your teeth. This is especially true if you have a diet low in foods containing calcium. As we learned earlier in this post, calcium is the foundation of teeth. When our teeth are deprived of that calcium, they don’t have the nutrients needed to build strong, healthy tooth enamel. Foods rich in calcium that may help you build tooth enamel include cheese, almonds, and leafy greens. Avoiding super acidic foods can also help reduce the chance you will develop white spots on your teeth, as acid reflux can trigger acid production and breakdown enamel.

Medications
Some medications may cause white spots on your teeth. Specifically, studies show that antibiotics like amoxicillin can impact the way your mouth builds tooth enamel, making it easier for bacteria to eat through tooth enamel. This happens because antibiotics have the potential to interfere with the way your body absorbs nutrients. Children are the most at-risk group when it comes to the impact of medications on tooth enamel.

Smoking While Pregnant
Smoking tobacco during pregnancy can cause white spots to appear on your child’s teeth. This happens because smoking tobacco during pregnancy can accelerate and promote the process of enamel hypoplasia. As discussed above, enamel hypoplasia ultimately thins the protective enamel on children’s teeth, making them vulnerable to infection and discoloration.

High Fevers
High fever can cause white spots on your teeth, although children are the most susceptible. This is because when you have a fever and feel dehydrated, your mouth and teeth usually take a back seat to feeling better. That means during the spell of a fever, acid has an opportunity to take advantage of a dry mouth and cause damage in the form of white spots on teeth. The best way to avoid this is to ensure your kiddo stays hydrated during a fever and to double down on oral care during their battle with whatever may be causing their fever.

Braces
Having braces can cause white spots on your teeth. If you have had braces at any point in your lifetime, you may notice faint white spots or thing white lines around the edges of where the brackets were glued to your teeth. This happens when minerals are stripped from the tooth due to a high amount of acidity present in the mouth. To avoid white spots popping up, it’s crucial to remove all food particles and debris from your braces as often as possible. In general, good oral hygiene can help reduce the chances of you being left with white spots on your teeth once your braces are removed.

How to Get Rid of White Spots on Teeth
Treating white spots on your teeth can only be done with the help of your dentist. Luckily, there is more than one way to get rid of these annoying little spots.

Enamel Microabrasian
An enamel microabrasion treatment can help you get rid of white spots on your teeth. A microabrasion treatment on your teeth is a process that has similar results to teeth whitening, except the treatment is executed mechanically versus chemically. The process typically involves the use of tools including a rubber cup and a rotary mandrel. It sounds scary, but it’s a common process that dentists use to remove these white spots with the least amount of enamel loss.

Teeth Bleaching
Bleaching your teeth, also known as whitening, can help get rid of white spots on your teeth. The teeth whitening process is pretty straightforward. Essentially, your dentist will use one of two bleaches that are safe for your teeth - hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide. The way it works is that these bleaches will break up your white spots into smaller stains, making them less noticeable and your teeth brighter. Teeth whitening is unique because that is more than one way to get it done. For example, you could try over-the-counter teeth whitening strips. You can also try over-the-counter whitening toothpaste and mouthwash. However, the best way to get your teeth bleached and whitened is to talk with your dentist.

Porcelain Veneers
Veneers can help get rid of white spots on your teeth. Dental veneers, also known as porcelain veneers or porcelain laminates, are wafer thin protective coverings for your teeth that can conceal white spots and stains. They work because a dentist will create a customized veneer designed especially for your tooth color and shape. To adhere the veneer, your dentist will bond them using specialized dental tools. In order to get veneers, a person will usually have to go through three different visits to the dentist to first get a consultation, get fitted for dentures, and then another so the veneering process can be applied.

Article Source: https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2019/11/white-spots-on-teeth

Monday, January 20, 2020

Health Hack: Improving Oral Health


In this week's 'Health Hack' Jane Monzures is bringing you some great tips to help you improve the health of your mouth!

Friday, January 17, 2020

Regency Dental Promo Video



If you have suffered from bad dental experiences, ask about oral sedation. It can ease your anxiety about dental treatment. We have provided this level of comfort to our patients for years. This is a family practice. We provide a complete solution to all your oral health and cosmetic needs from age 3 and up.

“Our Vacaville dental team specializes in treating people the way they tell us they want to be treated. Dr. Burton and team strive to take away the fear. We want you to obtain the beautiful smile you have always wanted." Pressed for time?

We have the technology to rebuild a broken tooth with an all-ceramic cap in one visit. Ask about our CEREC™

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

How Old is This Old Stuff


Follow the great advice that was given to Jenny Lorenzo! Leave that old toothpaste in the past and switch to Crest.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

How Veneers, Crowns and Dental Implants Help Patients


Dental technology continues to enhance and improve the dental experience for patients, giving them multiple options for common dental issues that were previously unavailable.

This is true for dental patients who have cracked, chipped, worn, rough teeth or have teeth that are missing.

In the past, patients with less than perfect teeth had to live with the embarrassment and discomfort as dental treatments were more expensive and considered unnecessary cosmetic procedures.

Over time with new technology, once-pricey, elaborate procedures have become quick, routine procedures that are no longer for the wealthy.

It is rare to naturally have a perfect smile where all the teeth are white, smooth, proportional and straight. It is the small deviations of a person's smile that makes it their one-of-a-kind smile. Many patients, however, don't see their imperfections this way. Some patients have trouble chewing, and speaking as well as headaches and jaw pain that is a result of their dental imperfections.

It is the crooked, non-proportional, jagged teeth that are most often treated by a dentist in order to ease the patient's pain and discomfort as well as enhance their confidence and self-esteem.

What kind of dental treatments are available for patients with less than desirable teeth?

The most common are veneers, crowns, and dental implants.

What Are Veneers, Crowns and Dental Implants?

You've likely heard of these before and have a vague idea of what they are and what they do. Here is a brief summary of each:

Veneers

Veneers are thin shells of porcelain that are placed to the front of teeth to enhance or correct their shape, size, and texture. Veneers are a quick procedure that can immediately change your smile for the better.

Crowns

Crowns are great options for patients who have moderate tooth decay or teeth that are chipped, cracked or worn-down. These gold, zirconia or porcelain coverings, go over the impacted tooth to prevent further damage and to keep the strength of the tooth intact.

Dental Implants

For patients who are missing a few teeth here and there, smiling can be unpleasant. You may think your smile is forever ruined and the thought of dentures scares you. Dental implants are the best solutions for your case. Implants are for patients who still have most of their natural teeth. Dental implants fill the empty space left behind with a naturally-looking tooth-like crown.

The Benefits of Veneers, Crowns and Dental Implants

Veneers, crowns, and dental implants can do wonders in restoring or enhancing your natural, unique smile. All three teeth procedures can give you your dream smile that you'll be proud to show-off. The confidence in one's smile can also improve your mood and make you more approachable as you'll be laughing and smiling away.

Besides enhancing your smile to its maximum potential, these dental treatments can correct and restore the proper functioning of your bite, allowing you to comfortably bite and chew and speak clearly. Being able to do these basic oral functions, a patient's quality of life can be greatly improved.

With modern dental equipment and technology, patients who have a less than ideal smile because of their tooth imperfections now can easily achieve the smile they've always wanted.

Patients should contact their dentist to discuss which option would best achieve their desired results.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anna_Bird/2355855

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Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Throwback Toothday: Secrets to a Swingin’ Smile


Remind your teens – when you can catch them – to take care of their teeth! Join us as we celebrate 160 years of driving dentistry forward by taking a trip through the ADA’s video archive.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

ADA Science Inside: How Tooth Whitening Works



Over time, teeth can go from white to not-so-bright for a number of reasons. Find out what foods can stain your teeth, and learn why your teeth darken with age. Then, watch as Dr. Jane Gillette from the American Dental Association explains how bleaching ingredients brighten your smile and walks through the whitening treatments you can try at home or have done in your dentist’s office.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Changing Your Smile With Restorative Dentistry


Healthy teeth are something most people take for granted. It is only when we experience tooth pain or have problems that we realize how nice it is to have healthy teeth. Taking care of our teeth is a principle most adults are taught as kids, but when corners are cut, problems start to happen. This is where restorative dentistry comes in.

What is Restorative Dentistry?

This branch of specialty dentistry focuses on restoring teeth. There are all kinds of problems that happen with the mouth over a lifetime including:

· Gum disease

· Broken teeth

· Missing teeth

· Chipped Teeth

· Stained or discolored teeth

· Displaced Teeth

These are all common problems that happen from accidents, dental trauma, and neglect. Having the right help to get your smile looking great again is something a restorative dentist is trained to do. Rather than only focusing on preventative measures to keeping cavities at bay, they want to help fix your problems to restore your smile to its glory after an accident.

Common Procedures

Restorative dentists have a lot of tools available to fix the problems you see with your smile. Some of these options include:

· Root canals

· Crowns

· Bridges

· Dental Implants

· Tooth-colored Fillings

· Full and partial dentures

After an assessment to see the damage, a dentist can give recommendations on what procedure is best for your situation. For instance, if you have a tooth knocked out in an accident, your only option is not a dental implant. Other factors need consideration like the age of the patient, placement of the tooth, and condition of the mouth. These are all requirements a restorative dentist will know more about and can diagnose more quickly than other professionals.

Making a New Smile

Restorative dentistry is more than just restoring a smile that was damaged. The tools available to a restorative dentist can help improve a smile that is just needing some extra work to make it perfect. Many people are born with a smile that is imperfect and needs correcting with procedures like:

· Straightening and whitening teeth

· Restoring and strengthening teeth and jaw bones

· Repair or replace chipped or broken teeth

· Replace missing or lost teeth

These procedures can make all the difference in the way you look and feel about yourself. Having a smile that you can proudly show will boost your self-confidence. When you feel great, you look great, which is exactly what restorative dentistry tries to do for patients.

Taking the First Step

The first thing you should do is find a restorative dentist and make an appointment. During the first visit, they will give you their opinion on what work is required. They will also give you an estimate on time it will take and how much it will cost. Most are willing to help with payment plans if you can't afford the price tag up front. The focus is on getting your smile to a place where you feel confident showing it and there is no pain in chewing or talking. It's time to stop covering up your smile and get some confidence. Find a restorative dentist in your area today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9803661